Anundshög is the largest tumulus in Sweden. It has a diameter of 60 metres and is about 9 metres high. Assessments of the era of the mound vary between the Bronze Age and the late Iron Age. A fireplace under it has been dated by radiocarbon dating to sometime between AD 210 and 540.

Some historians have associated the mound with the legendary King Anund, while others regard this as speculative. It is purported also that the name is taken from the large runestone at the site, the central stone in a row of 15 alongside the mound, re-erected in the 1960s and apparently marking out the route of the Eriksgata. The inscription on the runestone reads: "Folkvid raised all of these stones after his son Heden, Anund's brother. Vred carved the runes."

At the foot of the mound are 2 large stone ships placed end to end, 51 metres and 54 metres long. The site was a thing-place and the ship settings may be associated with this function.

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Anundsborg 2, Västerås, Sweden
See all sites in Västerås

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Founded: 1500 BC - 1000 AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Sweden
Historical period: Bronze Age (Sweden)

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