Nydala Abbey was a medieval Cistercian monastery. Nydala (from Swedish ny, meaning new, and dal, meaning valley) was called Sancta Maria de Nova Valle or just Nova Vallis in Latin. It was founded together with Alvastra Abbey in 1147 as the first cistercian monasteries in Sweden. King Gustavus Vasa appropriated the abbey in the 1520s, and the Danes sacked it in 1568. Part of the abbey church was rebuilt in the following years, and is still used as parish church. Some other ruins also remain visible at the site.

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Founded: 1147
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anders TN Hallqvist (13 months ago)
Interesting story. Well described, good information. Fun with recreated herb garden.
Arne Johansson (14 months ago)
Beautiful church and garden. Interesting to see
Bebe (14 months ago)
Nice historical place with a church and old stone ruins surrounded by nature.
Christer Larsson (17 months ago)
Well worth a visit as someone wrote earlier. The first time you hear of a monastery church.
meelis susi (17 months ago)
Very small portion today
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