Stones of Mora

Uppsala, Sweden

Stones of Mora was the place where the Swedish kings were elected. The origin of the tradition is unknown, but it has been known since the 13th century and mentioned by Snorri Sturlason (died 1241). The first known document tells that Magnus Ladulås was elected at the Stones of Mora in 1275. Magnus IV was elected at the stones on July 8, 1319 and Kristian I in 1457. He was the last to be elected at the stones.

The Stone of Mora and many stones which flanked it with inscriptions commemorating the elections of earlier kings, were probably destroyed in 1515 during the civil war against the Danes. Gustav Vasa and John III are said to have tried to reconstruct the Stones of Mora without success.

One of the fragments is known as the stone Three Crowns since it is the earliest known example of the use of Sweden's national symbol. The fragment is what remains of the election of Albert of Mecklenburg.

The building where the fragments are contained today was constructed by Carl Wijnbladh in 1770.

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Address

1060, Uppsala, Sweden
See all sites in Uppsala

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arthur Wolfe (2 years ago)
These cultural heirlooms of the Swedish people are amusingly kept in a small stone building right by the side of the road. Historically these stones have been of great importance, but today they are merely a neat oddity to take a quick look at if you are in the area anyway.
Nick Surton (4 years ago)
The Stones of Mora is a historic location where Swedish kings were elected until 1457.
Nick Surton (4 years ago)
The Stones of Mora is a historic location where Swedish kings were elected until 1457.
Emma Twiston - Davies (4 years ago)
It was a ok thing to go see but they should have had a English translation on the signs and a clearer view of these rocks
Emma Twiston - Davies (4 years ago)
It was a ok thing to go see but they should have had a English translation on the signs and a clearer view of these rocks
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