The oldest parts of Hovdala castle date from the 16th century, although it was first time mentioned already in the 12th century. There are so-called anchoring irons visible on the facade of one of the buildings are marked with the date 1511. Hovdala's gate tower, built in the early 1600's, served as a formidable entrance for the complex. This four-storey structure, with three-foot walls, withstood intensive fighting during Scania's turbulent periods. Hovdala Castle is today a popular visitor attraction and it is managed by the National Board of Antiques.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1511
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

de Gourét Litchfield (4 years ago)
An historic building and area with a great many activities and some beautiful scenery in the area... not least the Tree House and sleeping pods up on a nearby ridge.
Sebastian Huynh (4 years ago)
Its a wonderful place to relax and take a walk.
Anna Cismasu (4 years ago)
We took a brief visit as it was raining lots that day. Nothing we could visit inside of you don't get to come in time for the guiding. Nice and I'm sure you get much to see on a sunny day. If you love Batman and Dracula you got to see the exhibition. Love the red building called Orangeriet where they brought exotic plants when the Ehrenborgs owned the castle.
Pälle Syrén Mandelkonvalj (4 years ago)
An out of the ordinary castle dating back to the 16th century. Complete with bullet holes from the many wars between Denmark and Sweden. The castle is frequently host to different events during the year, such as medieval festivals, bat excursions and historic lectures. Has a restaurant and a cafe.
Gregor Shapiro (4 years ago)
Wonderful setting, especially in nice weather. One of, if not the, best gift shops weight crafts I have ever been in. A fine restaurant and a nice café.
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