Eslöv Museum

Eslöv, Sweden

Eslöv Museum lies in the heart of the town. It was established in 2000 and is contained within a former merchant’s house from the late nineteenth century. The museum’s permanent exhibition traces the development of the settlement from a small farming village to a thriving commercial centre as the railways arrived. The museum also hosts changing temporary exhibitions on themes with some relevance to the locality. It has attractive gardens. There is also a second hand bookshop here.

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Address

Östergatan 5, Eslöv, Sweden
See all sites in Eslöv

Details

Founded: 2000
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nirmal kumar (16 months ago)
Nice for kids
Frederick Lubbe (16 months ago)
Amazing collection of toys, very wide range. Amazing what 3 generations family has collected.
Abimbola AJOMALE (17 months ago)
Here you will find the history of toy collection of 4 generations. Also you won't want to miss a bottled Coca-Cola from 1940s
Bananafanofuno Carrie (19 months ago)
Really worth a visit
Zayide Ismayiljan (2 years ago)
Today we visited the museum with kids. It has tons of different toys from different ages, great collection. It was such a fun experience. Kids love it and so we are. It was a chance for us to introduce the kids some of the toys we played when we were litttle. The owner is also very friendly and kind.
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