Eslöv Museum

Eslöv, Sweden

Eslöv Museum lies in the heart of the town. It was established in 2000 and is contained within a former merchant’s house from the late nineteenth century. The museum’s permanent exhibition traces the development of the settlement from a small farming village to a thriving commercial centre as the railways arrived. The museum also hosts changing temporary exhibitions on themes with some relevance to the locality. It has attractive gardens. There is also a second hand bookshop here.

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Address

Östergatan 5, Eslöv, Sweden
See all sites in Eslöv

Details

Founded: 2000
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nicole Moody (8 months ago)
Quietly unassuming and tucked away in Eslöv is this quaint little museum that is well worth a day trip. It's a large family run collection of all sorts of bits and pieces, but what sets it apart are the model trains. Amazing for kids both big and little!
Jonas Söderström (8 months ago)
Under the unassuming name of "Eslövs Toy Museum" hides a pearl of fun for big and small kids. The private collection is both impressive and entertaining to browse. There are thousands of tin soldiers, 300+ smurfs and hundreds of lego kits. And that's just scratching the surface of the collection. But the crown jewel, and what kept us there for a good two hours, is the running model railways. What must be dozens of meters of it fills the majority of the museum and there are countless little details to look at. Highly recommend a visit to the museum.
Jerry Hon (10 months ago)
A lot of toys from different time period, lots of fun with kids.
Adam Rooth (10 months ago)
Incredible collection of toys from all aspects of the toyiverse. The building the museum is housed in needs some major renovation, but apart from that the whole museum is really impressive and well maintained.
Lara Mepham (2 years ago)
Packed full of amazing trains, Lego kits and toys from the last 50 years or so. The family who own and run the museum are very welcoming - well worth a visit!
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