Linköping Castle

Linköping, Sweden

Linköping Castle is Sweden's oldest profane building. The oldest part, west wing, dates from the 12th century. Currently the residence of the County Governor of Östergötland, the castle has been home to governors and bishops since the 13th century. The most famous bishop to live in castle was probably Hans Brask, Sweden's last Catholic bishop.

The Linköping Bloodbath, the public execution by beheading of five Swedish nobles in the aftermath of the Battle of Stångebro, in 1600 was held in either in Linköping market square or in the castle courtyard.

In 1700 most of Linköping city burned down, but the cathedral and castle survived. The decayed castle was moved as a city prison. The restoration began In 1796 and then the castle got its classicism style appearance. In 1880 it was again renovated to the neo-Renaissance style, but restored back to the current classicism in 1930s.

The old tower of the museum features an exhibit of the history of the castle, cathedral and diocese from the 12th century to today. Unique 14th century textiles and other valuables - especially from Sweden's empire period - are on display in the treasury. You can see a big model of the castle's state apartments in the great hall.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Light Code (7 months ago)
Great
Jenneke van der Velden (18 months ago)
Nice museum with very interesting history
Dennis H (2 years ago)
It's wonderful
Henrik Berglund (2 years ago)
Nice and old
Eva Km (3 years ago)
Having a boyfriend who is a history freak means that I get dragged into visiting various museums in various cities. There are worse things that can happen, you may say... but let's say I'm usually obliged to follow his request and accompany him to see all the archaic relics. This museum is no exception. Located a stone's throw away from the Linköping cathedral, the Linköping castle used to be the bishop's residence (It turned out, I did learn something about history). It's pretty neat if you lived there and worked at the church, no commuting necessary. When you get inside the museum entrance, the museum shop is right there on the entrance and you buy the ticket (60 kr for adult) from the cashier. You go to the right wing first to learn about the building's history where you could see the inside construction of the building, sort of. After that, you continue your visit to the upper floor. We were there during the exhibition called "Årets mat" and I was hoping to learn more about what kind of food they grew and eat during the year 1500 but was disappointed to see that the exhibition turned out very small indeed. We gave it a round and that's it. It could have been very interesting otherwise. That's why I only gave it two stars, not because I was dragged into this place (ha!) but because their exhibition turned out to be disappointing and the museum was actually very small, it was just one wing of the castle - they could've opened more part of the castle and showed more relics, after all it's a Castle and Cathedral museum.
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