Linköping Cathedral

Linköping, Sweden

The Linköping Cathedral is the seat for the bishop in the Church of Sweden Diocese of Linköping. The present church is about 800 years old. However, its history starts in the 11th century, with a wooden church being built. Later, around 1120, a stone church was being constructed; a basilica of about half the size of the present building.

Around 1230 it became necessary to construct a larger church, as the basilica had become too small. The church was extended to the East, with a new choir and transept. These parts remain as part of the present church. The current altarpiece is also from that period. The next extension of the church was made following the coronation of King Valdemar, in 1251. Now, the main building was constructed, and the church received its current length. Its length is 110 meters and the height of the tower is 107 metres.

Between 1408–1420 the chapels were constructed in Gothic architecture, with large windows and star shaped vaults. The chapels were named after Saint Andreas (later renamed into Saint Mary), St. Nicolaus and St. Thomas.

Fire damaged the roof of the church in 1546 and 1567. The tower was rebuilt between 1747–1758 and again between 1877–1886 by Helgo Zettervall. However, a restoration was made in 1967, restoring the shape of the 17th century roof. The roof is covered with copper plating. The corrosion has created the green color.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: c. 1120
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jacob Askenbom (9 months ago)
Impressive cathedral in a pretty and green city. The organist was practicing The Phantom of the Opera while we were there which was quite amusing.
Marija Rusaka (9 months ago)
Amazing and beautiful church ! Both interior and exterior are incredible! Definitely recommend to visit this gem of architecture of Lonkoping !
dsmage (10 months ago)
This church founded in the 10th century just keeps amazes me
Tenshi Aurion (12 months ago)
You know, it's a church. A large church. It has church things and is the main feature of the city center but doesn't really have that much pizazz because, you know, it's a church.
Simon Larsson (16 months ago)
The cathedral is impressive in size and architecture, but also in decorations - including more modern pieces. The summer guided walks focuses on religious meaning rather than historical, so I'd only bother with that if you're worshipping.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Abbey of Saint-Étienne

The Abbey of Saint-Etienne, also known as Abbaye aux Hommes ('Men"s Abbey'), is a former monastery dedicated to Saint Stephen (Saint Étienne). It is considered, along with the neighbouring Abbaye aux Dames ('Ladies" Abbey'), to be one of the most notable Romanesque buildings in Normandy. Like all the major abbeys in Normandy, it was Benedictine.

Lanfranc, before being an Archbishop of Canterbury, was abbot of Saint-Etienne. Built in Caen stone during the 11th century, the two semi-completed churches stood for many decades in competition. An important feature added to both churches in about 1120 was the ribbed vault, used for the first time in France. The two abbey churches are considered forerunners of the Gothic architecture. The original Romanesque apse was replaced in 1166 by an early Gothic chevet, complete with rosette windows and flying buttresses. Nine towers and spires were added in the 13th century. The interior vaulting shows a similar progression, beginning with early sexpartite vaulting (using circular ribs) in the nave and progressing to quadipartite vaults (using pointed ribs) in the sanctuary.

The two monasteries were finally donated by William the Conqueror and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, as penalty for their marriage against the Pope"s ruling. William was buried here; Matilda was buried in the Abbaye aux Dames. Unfortunately William"s original tombstone of black marble, the same kind as Matilda"s in the Abbaye aux Dames, was destroyed by the Calvinist iconoclasts in the 16th century and his bones scattered.

As a consequence of the Wars of Religion, the high lantern tower in the middle of the church collapsed and was never rebuilt. The Benedictine abbey was suppressed during the French Revolution and the abbey church became a parish church. From 1804 to 1961, the abbey buildings accommodated a prestigious high school, the Lycée Malherbe. During the Normandy Landings in 1944, inhabitants of Caen found refuge in the church; on the rooftop there was a red cross, made with blood on a sheet, to show that it was a hospital (to avoid bombings).