Trolle-Ljungby Castle

Fjälkinge, Sweden

Trolle-Ljungby Castle, enclosed by a moat, is one of most magnificent Renaissance buildings in Sweden. In the Middle Ages it was a fortified manor house, owned by Bille family. The current castle was erected in 1629 to the grounds of the previous castle, which had been burnt down in 1525. The west wing was added in 1633 and the east wing in 1787. The stone bridge in the northern side dates from 1806. The current owner of the castle is count Hans-Gabriel Trolle-Wachtmeister with her wife countess Alice Trolle-Wachtmeister, the Swedish Mistress of the Robes.

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Details

Founded: 1629
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Solveige Andersson (8 months ago)
Det var ett riktigt bra ställe, superfina produkter
Leticia Beltran (9 months ago)
Es un sitio impactante por su belleza, contrasta con la paz que se experimenta en aquel lugar, me hubiese gustado conocerlo por dentro, por fuera es magestuoso
Boberin Marcy (11 months ago)
Sweet
Žygimantas Buržinskas (15 months ago)
Nice but privite
Selma (4 years ago)
A very pretty location with cool architecture.
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