Saalau Castle Ruins

Chernyakhovsk, Russia

The Knights of the Teutonic Order appeared on this land in 1257. In 1352, when the Prussian lands were divided between the Church and the Monastic Order, Saalau and the surrounding lands were ceded to the Church. In 1355, the Church had already built here a Chapter House, known as the Cathedral Chancery. The building however was burnt down several times during Lithuanian raids. So in 1376 the Church authorities made a decision to raise a brick fortress, the so-called Kapitelburg.

This did not deter the Lithuanians from attacking the settlement and destroying the fort again, in 1390. In the same year, works on constructing a new and more powerful castle began. They were completed in just five years.

The construction of the castle was accompanied by the colonization of the lands along the upper course of the Pregel River. Colonists from German countries were brought to this area, where they mingled and assimilated with the local Prussian folk. At the foot of the castle a small town rose, with two competing inns.

When the Teutonic State was dissolved in 1525, Saalau was turned into a centre for local administration. In the 16th century the castle was ravaged by a fire, after which it was demolished.

Now the only remaining traces of the castle are some impressive ruins. The 18th century church, located on the other side of the road leading to the town, has had more luck. In the Soviet times, it was used as a club and a cinema and this has saved it from being pulled down.

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