Arvfursten Palace

Stockholm, Sweden

Arvfursten Palace (Arvfurstens palats) is located at Gustav Adolfs Torg in central Stockholm. Designed by Erik Palmstedt, the palace was originally the private residence of Princess Sophia Albertina. It was built 1783-1794 and declared a historical monument in 1935 and subsequently restored by Ivar Tengbom in 1948-52. Since 1906 the palace has served as the seat of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs.

The palace is facing the square Gustav Adolfs torg, with the Royal Swedish Opera on the opposite side. Located near the palace are the Sager Palace, official residence of the Prime Minister, and Rosenbad, official office of the government. The bridge Norrbro stretches past the Riksdag on Helgeandsholmen and further south to Stockholm Old Town and the Royal Palace.

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Details

Founded: 1783-1794
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Toan Vo (2 years ago)
Beautiful and dramatic building!
Maria Miroo (2 years ago)
Perfect palace
Daniel Chu (4 years ago)
Beautiful
Alan Gillett (4 years ago)
We visited Arvfurstens Palats in Stockholm and enjoyed the architecture and scenery immensely. The city is vibrant and comes alive at night and the people were very friendly, the only downside is it is a little expensive compared to home, so might not be the best location for a budget holiday... It was good to see where they hand out them Nobel Prizes though.
Med Robot (4 years ago)
good
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