Krypetsky Monastery

Pskov, Russia

Krypetsky Monastery is a Russian Orthodox monastery founded in 1485 by St. Savva Krypetsky, a Serbian monk from Mount Athos. Two years later, the Pskov veche supported his establishment by granting a large plot of land to the monks. Prince Obolensky had a road for pilgrims built through the mire to the monastery. St. Savva died on 28 August 1495 and was interred in the then timber cathedral, which was rebuilt in stone in 1547 and still stands.

Famous monks of the Krypetsky Monastery included Basil, who described the life of St. Savva in the 1540s; St. Nilus, who founded the Nilov Monastery on Stolbnyi Island; and the former chancellor Afanasy Ordin-Nashchokin, who had the monastery grounds greatly expanded and improved. In the 18th century, the abbey fell into disrepair, but was restored by Evgeny Bolkhovitinov, a bishop best known for his friendship with Gavriil Derzhavin and the latter's poems dedicated to him.

In 1918, the monastery was disbanded by the Bolsheviks who plundered more than five poods (2,600 troy ounces) of gold in the monastery sacristy and had its Neoclassical belltower disfigured. The abbey was briefly revived during the German occupation of the area in World War II and was finally restituted to the Russian Orthodox Church in 1991.

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Address

ulitsa Truda 70, Pskov, Russia
See all sites in Pskov

Details

Founded: 1485
Category: Religious sites in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

tatyana Chekmareva (3 months ago)
A beautiful monastery with an interesting history! But you won't be able to get there by public transport, you need to go by car or with a pilgrimage tour.
Александр Васильков (4 months ago)
Excellent! I recommend finding an opportunity to visit here! You will not regret
Денис Сафонов (4 months ago)
A very secluded and quiet abode in the middle of the forest, located far from the bustle of the world, with an extensive economy. A beautiful temple complex, on the holy spring of the 15th century on the banks of a picturesque pond, there are male and female pavilions with fonts. Near the temple there is a monument to the prominent Russian statesman Afanasy Ordin-Nashchokin. In this monastery he was tonsured a monk in the 17th century, under the name Anthony. Very affectionate cats live at the monastery, if they come up, they will not come off their feet, especially the tricolor one :-)
Sergejs Ivanovs5 (5 months ago)
Calm, quiet, comfortable. There is a baptismal font and a holy lake. Plunging into water and it solves vision problems.
Андрей Николаев (10 months ago)
A magical place, soft tub, beautiful forest. The monastery is young and interesting. Beautiful wooden temples, a new large stone temple. Silence, grace. Thank you Heavenly Father for this island of grace.
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