Krypetsky Monastery

Pskov, Russia

Krypetsky Monastery is a Russian Orthodox monastery founded in 1485 by St. Savva Krypetsky, a Serbian monk from Mount Athos. Two years later, the Pskov veche supported his establishment by granting a large plot of land to the monks. Prince Obolensky had a road for pilgrims built through the mire to the monastery. St. Savva died on 28 August 1495 and was interred in the then timber cathedral, which was rebuilt in stone in 1547 and still stands.

Famous monks of the Krypetsky Monastery included Basil, who described the life of St. Savva in the 1540s; St. Nilus, who founded the Nilov Monastery on Stolbnyi Island; and the former chancellor Afanasy Ordin-Nashchokin, who had the monastery grounds greatly expanded and improved. In the 18th century, the abbey fell into disrepair, but was restored by Evgeny Bolkhovitinov, a bishop best known for his friendship with Gavriil Derzhavin and the latter's poems dedicated to him.

In 1918, the monastery was disbanded by the Bolsheviks who plundered more than five poods (2,600 troy ounces) of gold in the monastery sacristy and had its Neoclassical belltower disfigured. The abbey was briefly revived during the German occupation of the area in World War II and was finally restituted to the Russian Orthodox Church in 1991.

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Address

ulitsa Truda 70, Pskov, Russia
See all sites in Pskov

Details

Founded: 1485
Category: Religious sites in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Лена Федотова (2 years ago)
Монахи этого монастыря одни из самых доброжелательных и общительных. Будьте внимательны при поездке, особенно в гололед, кюветы таять большую опасность, сами увидите памятники при подъезде. Сам же монастырь - это нечто необычайное, не поддающееся описанию внутреннее умиротворение.
MOTOFROG (2 years ago)
Посетили 29.09.2018. Дорога очень порадовала несмотря на грунт, в очень приличном состоянии. Источники - теплая вода !
Елена Агеева (2 years ago)
Очень красивое место. Храм два в одном, я такое видела в первый раз. Святой источник, купель. Святое место. По песчаной дороге 20 минут от Пскова
Юрий Дмитриевич (2 years ago)
Впечатление от посещения монастыря осталось отличное. Дорога к монастырю конечно оставляет желать лучшего, но добраться можно и в хорошую погоду. Переступив ворота монастыря почти сразу почувствовали спокойствие, умиротворение. Архитектурный ансамбль состоящий из храма и церкви ведиколепен. Интерьеры храма и церки поражают своей красотой. Получилось побывать внутри одним и всю красоту обозреть спокойно и без суеты, приложиться к ракам с мощами поеподобных Саввы и Корнилия Крыпецких и многим иконам. Разрешили подняться на колокольню, откуда открывается изумительный вид на территорию монастыря и окрестности. На территории расположено Святое озеро, с купелью на берегу. Прекрасное ощущение внутренней бодрости осталось после омовения в водах Святого озера в купели. На берегу так-же стоит часовня со Святым источником. После посещения монастыря осталось желание побывать там еще.
Gatto Uno (4 years ago)
The monastery is located in the forest. The wonderful aura around. There's no civilization, but mobile communication is stable.
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