Schaaken Castle Ruins

Niekrasowo, Russia

Schaaken Castle, built by Teutonic Order, was first mentioned in 1328. Today impressive ruins remain of this brick castle.

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Address

P515, Niekrasowo, Russia
See all sites in Niekrasowo

Details

Founded: 1328
Category: Ruins in Russia

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Татьяна Ильичева (2 years ago)
Были здесь зимой. За 150 рублей с человека провели интересную экскурсию по помещениям. Сами осмотрели развалины замка. Грустно становится от того, что этот замок в таком состоянии. Летом там, наверно, здорово!
Mikhail Noskov (2 years ago)
Very interesting historical place! Great people working here. Guided tour is strongly recommended. Good coffee. Recommend to drink it outside. Old castle of 13 century. Очень красивый старинный замок. Приятно приехать с детьми. Предусмотрена бесплатная парковка. Экскурсовод - очень знающий - расскажет историю замка и проведет по его коридорам. Есть кафе, где можно поесть и выпить кофе. С кофе можно посидеть и на улице - места предусмотрены. Есть небольшой музей с репликами старинного оружия. Можно надеть на себя шлем и попрактиковаться в обращении с мечом. Все очень понравилось. Спасибо людям, которые здесь работают и оберегают такое замечательное место.
Анастасия Серых (2 years ago)
Недавно решили съездить в этот замок. Впечатлений масса! Было очень интересно. Вход стоит 150 рублей. Мы посмотрели тот самый знаменитый колодец, походили по руинам замка, в подземелье.. Всё внутри оформлено под средневековье, да и снаружи тоже. Нам очень понравилось окунуться в эту атмосферу) там даже есть таверна в одном из зданий, можно посидеть у камина, погреться, попить чай... И померить средневековые костюмы. На улице есть развлекухи, подходящие для детей. Можно покататься на качелях, пострелять из лука.
English Trainer (2 years ago)
The best castle to visit
Partha Choudhury (2 years ago)
Not in good condition
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