Gizycko Castle Ruins

Gizycko, Poland

The city of Gizycko (Ger. Lötzen) was founded as a village surrounding the Teutonic Order's castle, built around 1340. The castle was built during the reign of Grand Master Winrich von Kniprode, located in a strategic position - on the isthmus between Lakes Niegocin and Kisajno. It was a dwelling with a rectangular courtyard, surrounded by a wall, and functioned as a residence of the Teutonic Order's prosecutor. The castle was destroyed during the attacks of Lithuanians led by Prince Kiejstut, but was rebuilt by the Teutonic Knights soon after. The Thirteen Years' War caused much damage to both the castle and the settlement. After the secularisation in 1525, the castle became the princely administrator's seat and was reconstructed in Renaissance style, during 1613-1614.

In the 17th century the castle became private property. The new owner added two wings (destroyed by fire in the same century) for administrative purposes, and a building with a small cylindrical tower, which was destroyed in 1945. In the 19th century, part of the castle was pulled down, and only one four-storey dwelling wing with a saddle roof and a cellar with cruciform vault were left. The castle has remained in this form until today. It hosted, among others, general Dabrowski and his officers in 1807. It was temporarily used to house the builders of the Gizycki Canal, and served also as the Fortress Boyen Commandant's quarters. Today the remnants of the castle are in bad condition and are not being restored.

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Details

Founded: c. 1340
Category: Ruins in Poland

More Information

www.castlesofpoland.com

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User Reviews

Iwona Burzyńska (9 months ago)
Oba pokoje przetestowane. Obsługa super, pomagają na każdym etapie ;)
Krystian Wójtyra (11 months ago)
Polecam siedzi tam bardzo przyjemna pani i bardzo ładnie się uśmiecha xdd
Robert Lepich (11 months ago)
Swietna zabawa! Na plus, ze jednocześnie rozwiązuje się więcej zagadek- kazdy z członków może zająć się innym zadaniem.
natalia romanowicz (12 months ago)
Byliśmy w escape roomie pierwszy raz i naprawdę świetnie się bawiliśmy. Jedynie cena mogłaby być trochę niższa, bo 25zł to trochę drogo, zwłaszcza, gdy płaci się za kilka osob z jednego, rodzinnego budżetu.
Ula A. (13 months ago)
We did both rooms, really enjoyed both of them. I'd recommend to go with 3-4 people, the rooms are quite small and it can distract if you are 5, but that's my personal opinion :)
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