Ilmajoki Church

Ilmajoki, Finland

The current wooden church is the third one in Ilmajoki and it was inaugurated in 1766. The large cruciform church has 1000 seats and it was built by Matti Honka. The belfry dates from 1804. The altarpiece has been painted by Alexandra Frosterus-Såltin in 1879. The original altarpiece, painted by Johan Alm, is today in Ilmajoki Church Museum. Next to the church there is a beautiful churchyard and a mausoleum of local Könni family.

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Details

Founded: 1766
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

More Information

finnish-churches.blogspot.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Markku Vierimaa (8 months ago)
Kirkko on kirkko.
Markku Koskimäki (8 months ago)
Kotikirkkoni
Marko M (13 months ago)
Kirkonrakentaja Matti Hongan 1764-1766 rakentama puinen ristikirkko on järjestyksessään Ilmajoen kolmas. Kirkossa on 900 istumapaikkaa, 34-äänikertaiset urut, WC-tilat ja esteetön sisäänkäynti. Kirkon vieressä sijaitseva kellotapuli on rakennettu 1804. Ilmajoen kirkko toimii kesäisin Tiekirkkona.
Raimo Lybeck (15 months ago)
Hi VK
Jari Sundman (18 months ago)
Upea vanha ristikirkko .hieno vaivaisukko tervehtimässä kellotapulin läheisyydessä, takana kirkko jonka sisäpuoli herkistää ihailuun sekä väreineen että kokonaisuutensa vuoksi. Jos puutteita haluaa kaivaa niin rakennus joka on tehty aikaan ennen autojen omaa myös hiukkasen huonot parkkipaikat, varsinkin liikuntarajoitteisille.
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