Levänluhta

Storkyro, Finland

Levänluhta is a swampy source known for mysterious prehistoric findings. According archaeological excavations about hundred people have been buried to the former lake of Levänluhta in the Iron Age. Archaeologists have also found several remains of bronze and silver jewelry and tools.

There are remains of buried children, elderly and animals of different ages. The human bones of Levänluhta are dated to the 300-700's. They are historically thought to be sacrificed human victims, but the site can also be an ancient cemetery for people died of starvation or diseases.

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Details

Founded: 300-700 B.C.
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Finland
Historical period: Iron Age (Finland)

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tanjuusa (2 years ago)
An interesting history.
Heikki Vesala (2 years ago)
miika öland (3 years ago)
A hold in the ground where they sometimes float up legs.
Susanna Verkkosaari (6 years ago)
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