Mariefred Charterhouse Ruins

Mariefred, Sweden

Mariefred Charterhouse, sometimes referred to as Gripsholm Charterhouse, was a Carthusian monastery, or charterhouse. It was the only Carthusian monastery in Scandinavia, and one of the last monasteries established in Sweden before the Reformation.

The establishment of a Carthusian monastery in Sweden was brought about by the efforts of Jakob Ulvsson, Archbishop of Uppsala, and Kort Rogge, Bishop of Strängnäs, who in 1493 persuaded Sten Sture the elder, Regent of Sweden, to have the monks Fikke Dyssin and Johannes Sanderi together with two lay brothers sent from the Marienehe Charterhouse near Rostock to Sweden for a meeting with the riksrådet (Privy Council of Sweden). Later that year Sten Sture enfeoffed the Carthusians with the Gripsholm estate in Selebo härad in Södermanland and in 1502 gave them other lands round about.

The monastery was built on the high ground where Mariefred church now stands, built on the charterhouse ruins in the 1620s, close to Gripsholm Castle. The monastery church was dedicated on 15 February 1504.

Mariefred Charterhouse was short-lived: in 1526 it was one of the first monasteries secularised by Gustav Vasa. In December 1525 he claimed its assets from the heirs of Sten Sture the Elder, who had given the estate to the monastery on the condition that it should pass to the right heirs of the monastery if it were ever wound up. This claim was legitimated by the Privy Council in January 1526.

Virtually no trace of the monastic buildings now remains above ground: Gustav Vasa had them dismantled for the construction of Gripsholm Castle. A cellar and a few traces of walls have been discovered to the south of the church. A small collection of stones discovered during excavations in the monastery grounds, is in the current Mariefred church tower.

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Details

Founded: 1493
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

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User Reviews

Prajakta Jogdand (11 months ago)
Beautiful church visible from everywhere in the town.
Juan Carlos culturadelarte (13 months ago)
Mariefred Church (Mariefreds kyrka) was built in 1621-1624 over the ruins of the old Carthusian monastery. It was built of stone and was burned down in 1682 but rebuilt and completed in 1697. Today it is the parish church of Mariefred and is associated with the Diocese of Strängnäs.
Kristoffer Paulsson-Santander (2 years ago)
Easily one of my favourite small cities in Sweden. Well worth a visit!
ana purna (3 years ago)
beautiful old church, the center navigating point when walking around the town.
Sanna Wedman (4 years ago)
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