Hagby Church is one of Sweden's few preserved round churches, and is considered by many to be the best preserved one in the country. The predecessor of Hagby stone church was the wooded Saint Sigfrid chapel, which was located about two kilometres south of the present church structure. The construction of this stone church began in the late 12th century.

The structure was meant to serve both as a sanctuary and a fortified building. As a result, the upper part of the walls has openings for shooting and spear throwing. The most recent renovation has attempted to emphasize the old nature of the building, so that it is now perhaps the best example of round church architecture, which otherwise is generally mostly found on the island of Bornholm. The triumph crucifix and font dates from the Middle Ages, but the interior is mainly from the 17th and 18th centuries.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturf?hrer in Farbe. Schweden. M?nchen 1987.
  • Kalmar Tourism

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www2.kalmar.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Denni Renud (18 months ago)
Thank God for this holy place ?
Joakim Mårtensson (19 months ago)
Nice, but unfortunately a religious building.
Marianne Norberg (2 years ago)
Beautiful church, we also got an interesting guide.
Marcus Lindblom (2 years ago)
Well worth a stop or the detour from the main road if you are not in a hurry.
Jonny och Ann-Christine Andersson (2 years ago)
A beautiful church with a new interesting interior where the church's round shape is maximized.
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