Bengtskär Lighthouse

Kimitoön, Finland

Towering 52 meters above the sea, Bengtskär lighthouse is the tallest one in Scandinavia. The building started in in 1905 after the shipwreck of S/S Helsingfors and was completed in 1906. The lighthouse was designed by architect Florentin Granholm. On December a special petrol lantern, designed and built in Paris, was brought to Bengtskär and installed atop the tower.

German fleet bombarded Bengstkär in the First World War in 1914. Since the Gulf of Finland was heavily mined, it was not until 1919 that the surrounding seas were declared safe for shipping, that the light was lit again.

After the war the military value of Bengtskär increased as part of the defence system of independent Finland. In Second World War (1941) Soviet Union made a suprise attack to island. After a bloody battle, the small Finnish garrison emerged victorious. Intermittent repairs to the facility continued during the post-war period. Finally, the lighthouse was re-opened in 1950.

Today the Bengtskär lighthouse is a popular tourist attraction providing a museum, varying exhibitions, cafe and accomodation services. The lighthouse is open for visitors every day between June 1st and August 31st. The shortest sea route to Bengtskär goes through the beautiful archipelago. The trip from Kasnäs to Bengtskär takes about an hour.

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1905-1906
Category:
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alex Kovachevich (15 months ago)
We had a great visit and totally enjoyed our night at the lighthouse. Food, sauna, room was all great. We had the good luck of having some strong winds in the morning which stopped boat traffic to the island meaning we had the island to ourselves. A real treat and fantastic experience. Fully recommend.
Yoto Yoto (16 months ago)
I spent a night at Bengtskär and it was simply amazing! The hosts were super friendly and even organized a english island tour for me, the food was delicious (vegetarian), especially the homemade buns at the after lunch coffee! The rooms were cozy and clean. The sauna in the evening was just a dream! The location... well you have the chance to spent a night in beautiful lighthouse on a beautiful island far away from everything, it can't get better than that! Yes it's pricy, but trust me you won't regret it. It's 100 percent worth it!
Selja Hytönen (3 years ago)
Beautiful place to visit in the middle of the sea. Nice place to spend one day (or even more)
Olli Mustonen (4 years ago)
Hieno kohde Hangosta tai Kasnäsistä. Hangosta retki maksoi kesällä 2018 n.60e ja siihen sisältyi matka, maihinnousu sekä lohikeitto. Kiva päiväretki.
Kevin O'Brien (4 years ago)
Went there on a hot, sunny summer day and were met by a friendly man who told us about the island and lighthouse. We paid the landing fee (8 euro), which was quite reasonable as it included admission to the lighthouse. We enjoyed coffee and fresh pulla (sweet buns) in the coffee shop. You can even get Bengtskär lighthouse own ground coffee from the cafe! We climbed the spiral staircase to the light for fantastic views and the climb was worth it! Other nice features include names engraved into the smooth granite bedrock and even we even found a geocache near the bunker. Overall a fantastic place and a great experience. I would recommend making the effort to visit.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.