St Andrea's Church in Hiittinen (Hitis) was built in 1686 and it’s the second oldest cross shape church in Finland. There was a chapel in Hiittinen already in the 13th century. Some stone wall ruins of that building are remaining in the small cemetery.

The altarpiece is painted by A.F.Ahlstedt, and the pulpit is a late plainer replica of the one in the Dome of Turku from 1650.

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Details

Founded: 1686
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Finland)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juha Vanhatalo (2 years ago)
Pieni näyttävä kirkko
Tanja Harjunen (3 years ago)
Aivan ihana puinen saaristokirkko. Kannattaa käydä tutustumassa. Kaunis ympäristö ja historiaa huokuvat puitteet.
Markku Heikkinen (3 years ago)
Vanha puukirkko
Adrián Rodríguez Fassanello (3 years ago)
Excelente
Henrik Krause (4 years ago)
Suomen toiseksi vanhin puuristikirkko. Ehdottomasti näkemisen arvoinen. Aito konstailematon tunnelma, jossa ei taideaarteilla turhaan koreilla ja juuri siksi kaikki tuntuukin arvokkaalta.
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