Mathildedal Ironworks

Salo, Finland

Mathildedal is one of the three Teijo area ironworks villages. It offers all the elements of an idyllic environment: Wooden houses painted with traditional red paint, buildings of the ironwork, history, culture, nature and of course the living village itself.

The origins of Mathildedal ironworks go back to 1686. Mr Lorenz Creutz from Teijo was granted a right to build a forgery in Hummeldal.

In 1825 Mr Robert Bremer discovered ironstone in the ground starting the glory days for Hummeldal factory and the whole area. His son Viktor Zebor Bremer continued running the ironworks after him.

The last ironworks factory was established in Hummeldal in 1852 by Viktor Zebor Bremer and he renamed the village to Mathildedal after his wife Mathilda. The whole environment represents a typical 19th century ironworks milieu. And today the remaining buildings serve as a centre for cultural tourism.

The naturally beautiful area is the gateway to Archipelago. We offer a variety of occasions and services thoughout the year. The high class meeting and festival service guarantees a successful day with its cosy meeting room, tasty food and additional activities. For culture enthusiasts we have an exhibition of the old ironworks, guided tours, open air summer theater, concerts, art exhibitions and other events.

The colourful café Kyläkonttori & Puoti and the restaurant Ruukin Krouvi serve tasty delicacies for food lovers. Ruukin Kehräämö & Puoti is a lifestyle boutique specializing in knitted alpaca wool clothing. In Huldan Puoti you can make great findings among vintage and antiques.

Old factory buildings, friendly service and the park-like surroundings near the sea offer experiences, harmony and rugged beauty for all senses.

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Address

Ruukinrannantie 8, Salo, Finland
See all sites in Salo

Details

Founded: 1852
Category: Industrial sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.mathildedal.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ja Suratwadee (5 months ago)
There is an event 'Pumpkin Patch' 15-31 October. It is very creative idea to decorate the museum in Halloween theme ????
Mika Valtonen (7 months ago)
Exploring the wings of history..
Kimmo Karinen (3 years ago)
Beautiful place for weddings
Ismo Helenius (4 years ago)
A nice old ironworks, a nice coffee place and a port for guest boats.
Kare Bryant24 (5 years ago)
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