Bjärka-Säby Castle

Bjärka-Säby, Sweden

Bjärka-Säby Castle is a baroque style château built for Swedish diplomat and nobleman, Germund Louis Cederhielm. The building was based upon plans from a prominent Swedish landscape architect, Fredrik Magnus Piper. Construction started in 1791 and was completed just before 1800. The surrounding landscape was design in the manner of a traditional English park. The palace was subject to renovation in 1894-1898 based upon plans of architect Agi Lindegren (1858-1927). His work differ from Piper's design and resulted in a Baroqueappearance.

Proposals for a restoration of the interior were advanced principally by Sigurd Curman, secretary of the Swedish National Heritage Board. Between 1920-1921, Eric Fant, architect at the Nordic Museum, conducted renovations reflecting the manor's origin in the late 1700s. The exterior has been allowed to retain the appearance resulting from the Agi Lindgren based conversion.

Since 1980, the château has been owned by Sionförsamlingen i Linköping, the Swedish Pentecostal movement's church in Linköping.

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Details

Founded: 1791-1800
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sara Rrenja (2 years ago)
Very beautiful place
Stuart Giddens (2 years ago)
Beautiful setting, amazing dining room. The lake is a two minute walk from the café, superb for a dip in a hot sunny day.
Niklas Boknäs (2 years ago)
Fantastic surroundings, ok food.
Jan Arne Lervåg (2 years ago)
Beautiful surroundings. Beautiful castle.
Martin Karlsson (3 years ago)
Underbar plats! En plats fylld av bön och gemenskap
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