Yaroslav's Court (Yaroslavovo Dvorishche) was the princely compound in the city of Novgorod the Great. Today it is roughly the area around the Trade Mart, the St. Nicholas Cathedral, the Church of St. Procopius, and the Church of the Myrrh-bearing Women. The Trade Mart renovated and heavily modified in the 16th and 17th centuries, is all that is left of the princely palace itself. The prince also had a compound called the Riurik's Court (Riurikovo Gorodishche) south of the marketside of the city.

Yaroslav's Court is named after Yaroslav the Wise who, while prince of Novgorod in 988–1015, built a palace there. The Novgorodian veche often met in front of Yaroslav's Court and in 1224 several pagan sorcerers were burned at the stake there.

According to the traditional scholarship, after the Novgorodians evicted Prince Vsevolod Mstislavich in 1136, Novgorod began electing their princes and forbade them from holding land in Novgorod. Yaroslav's Court then ceased to be a princely compound and the prince resided at Riurik's Court. Between 1113 and 1136, the Saint Nicholas Cathedral was built at the court. The cathedral is intact and is the second oldest building in Novgorod after the Saint Sophia Cathedral.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Russia

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Евгений Сорокин (14 months ago)
The arcade of Gostiny Dvor and the Gate Tower of Gostiny Dvor are what remains of the once large complex of its buildings. The stone buildings of Gostiny Dvor began to be erected in 1692 and completed in 1700. Gostiny Dvor consisted of buildings connected to each other in a line, located along the perimeter of a trapezoid (irregular quadrangle), forming a closed courtyard. It is sometimes described as a trapezoidal square. In the 1770s, Gostiny Dvor was reconstructed on the old foundation. A building with an arcade was erected, forming the western line (partly included in the north and south). In 1889, this building (line) had 21 shops, each with a separate entrance and a window with an iron grate. The windows overlooked the gallery, the western part of which was the arcade. During the Second World War, the buildings of the Gostiny Dvor received significant damage. All buildings, except for the Gate Tower, were dismantled. Only the arcade was preserved, which was previously part of the building (gallery) of the shopping arcade, while it was also going to be dismantled, but after the intervention of a number of representatives of Soviet science and culture, the arcade was saved. According to some reports, part of it was dismantled when instructions from Moscow followed, and the arcade had to be restored. Now the arcade of Gostiny Dvor is one of the attractions of Novgorod, although not all tourists understand what kind of structure it is. Moreover, not all Novgorodians know this. The arcade looks very nice from the pedestrian bridge over the Volkhov, especially at night in the backlight. There is still such a thing with backlight. There is such a plate between the columns of the arcade, from which it can be learned that the lighting of the arcade was carried out with the support of the Governor of St. Petersburg V.I. and the Government of St. Petersburg (members of the government, unlike the governor, are not listed by name) in June 2011. This is a fairly common example of the expression of the commanding servility of the leadership of Veliky Novgorod. Not only is the surname, name and patronymic of the now former governor completely written in capital letters, and these are the only words in the text, which is written in this way, and the very name of the monument is written in small letters. But the point is also that I have not seen or found any sign indicating what the monument itself is, that is, the arcade of Gostiny Dvor. In other words, we have a pointer to highlight the monument, but there is no pointer to the monument. It is clear that lighting is more important for Novgorod officials, given who supported it. And the arcade - so, an attachment to the lighting, no more.
heaven lee (21 months ago)
Interesting History. Novgorod was once a big commercial spot. This city was one of Hanseatic alliance city, with London and Stokholm. Properous city. But Ivan the terrible trampled this city, because it is dangerous to Moscow country and did not obey to his opinion. According to explanation this territory was for selling products, like market.
Mircea Stoica (2 years ago)
Recommend.
The Master (2 years ago)
Ухоженные место, погулять вокруг одно удовольствие. Но памятник стоит посещать только в летнее время года, так как зимой немного не то впечатление. Он по сути должен подсвечиваться вечером, что должно выглядеть очень красиво, но нам не удалось этого увидеть, ушли раньше. В целом выглядит не заброшено, как это бывает со многими культурными архитектурными памятниками в России, и это радует
Ria K (3 years ago)
Nice place
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