The current Nynäs manor house was built in the 17th century by the Gyllenstierna family and modernized inside and out in 1835. It was a private residence until 1984, when the County of Sörmland and Nationalmuseum acquired the house and all its contents. Today’s visitors enter a living milieu on which different generations have left their mark. The public rooms are decorated with magnificent stucco ceilings from the late 17th century. The house also contains rich collections of portraits and furniture. The cupboards are full of textiles and glass sets. The old kitchen, which escaped 20th-century modernization, displays all its pots, pans and trays. In the orangery next to the manor house, you will find a café and a garden shop.

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Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.