St. Nicholas' Church

Nyköping, Sweden

St. Nicholas' is one of the medieval churches in Nyköping.The building history is quite complex and the age is therefore unknown. it is probably founded in the 12th century. The church was enlarged in the 14th century and the tower was added a century later. The church was burnt during the two major town fires in 1665 and 1719. The oldest item in the church is a altar made around 1500.

References:
  • Visit Nyköping
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.nykopingsguiden.se

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monica Lerjerud (13 months ago)
Vacker och stämningsfull
Sultan Channel (13 months ago)
Per Gunnar Annerback (2 years ago)
Gammal fin kyrka, bästa akustiken längst bak i kyrkan
Maxime LMA (2 years ago)
Belle église mais impossible de voir l'intérieur ?
Simon Larsson (3 years ago)
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