Nyköping Castle

Nyköping, Sweden

Nyköping Castle is a medieval castle from the Birger Jarl era, partly in ruins. The castle is mostly known for the ghastly Nyköping Banquet which took place here in 1317. The construction of the castle began in the end of the 12th century, when it began as a fortification. It is thought Birger Jarl expanded the building to a larger castle. During the reign of Albert of Sweden the castle was held as a fief by the German knight Raven van Barnekow, who made important improvements on the building, and later by Bo Jonsson Grip. Further reconstructions and expansions were done during the late Middle Ages. Gustav Vasa strengthened the castle further for defensive purposes and a round gun tower from that time remains today.

The medieval castle was rebuilt in the end of the 16th century by Duke Charles (later Charles IX of Sweden) into a renaissance palace. The palace burned down with the rest of the city in 1665. It wasn't reerected; in fact some of its bricks were used in the construction of Stockholm Palace. However, parts of the castle were sound enough to be used as county residence until the 1760s.

Parts of the castle were refurbished in the 20th century. Kungstornet (the King's Tower) and Gamla residenset (the Old Residence) currently house the permanent exhibits of Sörmlands museum (the Museum of Södermanland). A restaurant is located in the banquet hall and Drottningkällaren (the Queen's Cellar).

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Details

Founded: 1317
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nastya Vetoshnikova (2 years ago)
Wow museum with a lot of interesting info and awesome paper models of castle and some scenes of life.
Nilansh Jain (2 years ago)
Quaint little city close to Stockholm Skavasta airport. We were waiting for our train to Stockholm and had an hour so went to a nearby castle. The history was rich and there was also a stream outside of it. Spent a good hour.
Gerald Reisz (2 years ago)
This is an unexpected gem in the town of Nyköping. The museum is located in the King's Tower part of the old castle. We thought we would be there 15 minutes. We spent over two hours. Admission is free. English language guides are provided on each level of the tower. You can learn a lot about the last thousand years of Swedish history outside of Stockholm. For example, what crimes would put you in jail in medieval Sweden and for how long? Another plus, no tour groups.
Joakim Emanuelsson (2 years ago)
Good familj event, kids loved the guiding
Jiahao Sun (2 years ago)
The place itself is well planned. Obviously. I guess kids would like it very much.
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