Sorunda Church

Sorunda, Sweden

Sorunda church is an unusually large, medieval church. Its history goes back to the 12th century with major additions made in the 15th and 16th centuries (the current exterior dates mainly from 1540). The church contains burial chapels for local aristocratic families and several interior details dating from the Middle Ages, notably an unusually fine wooden sculpture by Herman Rode. The altar screen dates from the late 1400s and is probably made by Bertil Målare's workshop.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Address

Kyrkgatan 26, Sorunda, Sweden
See all sites in Sorunda

Details

Founded: 1540
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

www.visitnynashamn.se

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fredrik Richardsson (2 years ago)
One of the most beautiful churches I have visited. Well worth a visit
Håkan Nilsson (2 years ago)
Very nice church in a beautiful place! Today there was a wedding on the agenda!
finvovve (2 years ago)
Nice little unusual church.
Piotr Pawlukiewicz (2 years ago)
Lovely church
Isabelle Fernström (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, but too bad the church was locked in the middle of the day ...
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