Ny Kirke (New Church) is a 12th century round church located in the village of Nyker. Built in the Romanesque style with two storeys, it contains frescoes from various periods and a pulpit with 17th century-panels. Ny Kirke is normally considered to be the youngest of the island's four round churches. It was originally called "Ecclesia Omnium Sanctorum" (All Saints Church). The present name dates from the middle of the 16th century.

The church consists of an apse, a rectangular choir and a round nave, all from the Romanesque period. It is built of granite fieldstone apart from the central column and the window frames which are in finished limestone. The semicircular tympanum over the south door is made from a single block of limestone. The porch, dating from the Late Gothic period, it is somewhat younger than the body of the church itself. The apse has three windows and a half-domed vault while the choir has a barrel vault. The chancel arch has been enlarged judging by the remains of a smaller Romanesque arch. It appears the windows have also been widened.

A frieze round the top of the central pillar is divided into 13 panels with paintings of the Passion in the early Gothic style. They appear to be from around 1300 or a little later. The colouring is very simple: white, yellow and red ochre and moss green, as are the figures which lack detail. The frescoes were discovered by Jakob Kornerup in 1891 and restored by Egmont Lind in 1937. Kornerup also found a fresco to the left of the north door of St Christopher bearing the infant Jesus, probably from the 15th century but in view of its poor condition, it has now been whitewashed over. Above the north door there is a medallion depicting the Lamb of God with the chalice and the banner of the cross together with two panels illustrating the Annunciation.

The pulpit itself dates from the recent restoration but its carved decorations from the beginning of the 17th century are the work of Hinrich Ringering of Flensburg. The four panels depict Annunciation in Nazareth, the Nativity, the Adoration of the Magi and the Circumcision. The Romanesque font in the choir is of grey limestone imported from Gotland. The chandelier, originally from 1594, was restored in 1688. It bears a stylized split double eagle and two coats of arms. The church's smaller bell is from 1639 was cast for Sallerup Church in Scania while the larger one from 1725 was cast in Lübeck.

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Address

Ellebyvej 1A, Rønne, Denmark
See all sites in Rønne

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hans L D H (2 years ago)
Speciel kirke
Stephanie Kolwinski (2 years ago)
Beautiful little church. Does not take that much time to visit, but is nice to see.
Jens Pihl (2 years ago)
Flot velholdt og typisk.. Et godt sted at være
Hermann-Josef Holländer (2 years ago)
Schöne Rundkirche im Nordosten von Rønne. Schließt um 18:00
Michael Dam (2 years ago)
Ny kirke - Flotte nyrenoverede kalkmalerier!
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The first church on the spot was constructed in the early 4th century AD, replacing a Roman bath. A century later, a prefect named Leontios replaced the small oratory with a larger, three-aisled basilica. Repeatedly gutted by fires, the church eventually was reconstructed as a five-aisled basilica in 629–634. This was the surviving form of the church much as it is today. The most important shrine in the city, it was probably larger than the local cathedral. The historic location of the latter is now unknown.

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The basilica is famous for six extant mosaic panels, dated to the period between the latest reconstruction and the inauguration of the Byzantine Iconoclasm in 730. These mosaics depict St. Demetrius with officials responsible for the restoration of the church (called the founders, ktetors) and with children. An inscription below one of the images glorifies heaven for saving the people of Thessalonica from a pagan Slavic raid in 615.

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Following the Great Fire of 1917, it took decades to restore the church. Tombstones from the city"s Jewish cemetery - destroyed by the Greek and Nazi German authorities - were used as building materials in these restoration efforts in the 1940s. Archeological excavations conducted in the 1930s and 1940s revealed interesting artifacts that may be seen in a museum situated inside the church"s crypt. The excavations also uncovered the ruins of a Roman bath, where St. Demetrius was said to have been held prisoner and executed. A Roman well was also discovered. Scholars believe this is where soldiers dropped the body of St. Demetrius after his execution. After restoration, the church was reconsecrated in 1949.