Ny Kirke (New Church) is a 12th century round church located in the village of Nyker. Built in the Romanesque style with two storeys, it contains frescoes from various periods and a pulpit with 17th century-panels. Ny Kirke is normally considered to be the youngest of the island's four round churches. It was originally called "Ecclesia Omnium Sanctorum" (All Saints Church). The present name dates from the middle of the 16th century.

The church consists of an apse, a rectangular choir and a round nave, all from the Romanesque period. It is built of granite fieldstone apart from the central column and the window frames which are in finished limestone. The semicircular tympanum over the south door is made from a single block of limestone. The porch, dating from the Late Gothic period, it is somewhat younger than the body of the church itself. The apse has three windows and a half-domed vault while the choir has a barrel vault. The chancel arch has been enlarged judging by the remains of a smaller Romanesque arch. It appears the windows have also been widened.

A frieze round the top of the central pillar is divided into 13 panels with paintings of the Passion in the early Gothic style. They appear to be from around 1300 or a little later. The colouring is very simple: white, yellow and red ochre and moss green, as are the figures which lack detail. The frescoes were discovered by Jakob Kornerup in 1891 and restored by Egmont Lind in 1937. Kornerup also found a fresco to the left of the north door of St Christopher bearing the infant Jesus, probably from the 15th century but in view of its poor condition, it has now been whitewashed over. Above the north door there is a medallion depicting the Lamb of God with the chalice and the banner of the cross together with two panels illustrating the Annunciation.

The pulpit itself dates from the recent restoration but its carved decorations from the beginning of the 17th century are the work of Hinrich Ringering of Flensburg. The four panels depict Annunciation in Nazareth, the Nativity, the Adoration of the Magi and the Circumcision. The Romanesque font in the choir is of grey limestone imported from Gotland. The chandelier, originally from 1594, was restored in 1688. It bears a stylized split double eagle and two coats of arms. The church's smaller bell is from 1639 was cast for Sallerup Church in Scania while the larger one from 1725 was cast in Lübeck.

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Address

Ellebyvej 1A, Rønne, Denmark
See all sites in Rønne

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hans L D H (7 months ago)
Speciel kirke
Stephanie Kolwinski (9 months ago)
Beautiful little church. Does not take that much time to visit, but is nice to see.
Jens Pihl (11 months ago)
Flot velholdt og typisk.. Et godt sted at være
Hermann-Josef Holländer (11 months ago)
Schöne Rundkirche im Nordosten von Rønne. Schließt um 18:00
Michael Dam (15 months ago)
Ny kirke - Flotte nyrenoverede kalkmalerier!
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