Kristineberg Palace

Stockholm, Sweden

Kristineberg Palace in Kungsholmen was built around 1750 for the businessman R. Schröder. The palace was surrounded by parks and the property included a great deal of the surrounding land. In 1864 the property was bought by the Swedish Freemasonry and additional construction on the palace was made. Stockholm City bought the land in 1921 and started building the Kristineberg district, and today part of the palace is used as a school.

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Details

Founded: 1750
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Giulio Caccin (12 months ago)
Just passed by on a quiet winter day. You can take pictures of the guards. Really nice change of guard ritual.
Robin Van Steen (12 months ago)
We were only outside for the changing of the guard. Beautiful building, partly being renovated as we speak. The changing of the guard was quite long and maybe too informative, but on the other hand very interesting to see so many women and young people in the army. In the winter it might be really cold, with the wind and no sun, so keep that in mind when visiting!
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