Arresødal was created as a manor in 1773 by Major General Johan Frederik Classen. He ordered the building of the main house in 1786-1788. Upon his death, Classen bequeathed Arresødal to Prince Charles of Hesse-Kassel, who owned the property until Crown Prince Frederik (later King Frederick VI of Denmark) bought the property in 1804. The main building was rebuilt in 1908-1909 and partly in 2004. Two other buildings on the estate are protected.

In 1883 the property was purchased by the Classen Fideicommis. It was then a convalescent home for women until 1944 when it was taken over by first the Germans and then the freedom fighters who used the buildings as a prison. It once again became a convalescent home until 1984 when Arresødal was sold to KMD Kommunedata.

Today Arresødal functions as a private hospital. The park is now open to the public.

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User Reviews

Kasper Brandt (2 years ago)
Elsker stedet! De må bære mig derfra!
Claus Wagner (3 years ago)
Fantastisk beliggenhed Lige i skoven og kun 700 m gang til Arresø
Lars Søe Jørgensen (3 years ago)
Godt og velfungerende hospice.
Hanne Olsen (3 years ago)
Skøn sejltur på Arresø med "Frederikke".
Helle Henrikka Mattsson (3 years ago)
Dejligt sted, fredfyldt og harmoniske omgivelser - dejlige personaler med altid smil på læberne.
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