Viking Ship Museum

Roskilde, Denmark

The Viking Ship Museum (Vikingeskibsmuseet) is the Danish national museum for ships, seafaring and boatbuilding in the prehistoric and medieval period.

Around the year 1070, five Viking ships were deliberately sunk at Skuldelev in Roskilde Fjord in order to block the most important fairway and to protect Roskilde from enemy attack from the sea. These ships, later known as the Skuldelev ships, were excavated in 1962. They turned out to be five different types of ships ranging from cargo ships to ships of war.

The Viking Ship Museum overlooks Roskilde Fjord and was built in 1969 especially to exhibit the five newly-discovered ships. In the late 1990s excavations for an expansion of the museum uncovered a further 9 ships including the longest Viking warship ever discovered, at 36 metres.

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Category: Museums in Denmark

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomas Sharky (11 months ago)
For the people who like history of Vikings and reading a lot, its great place. But for people who likes to see things, you can finish this in 15 min. There are 5 ships (not really, because some are only 25% some 75% reconstructed. I think the price 110 DKK does not reflect the experience / value you get.
Swathi Lekshmi (12 months ago)
If you are interested in history and Vikings, you must visit this place. You will also enjoy to dress up like Vikings and have a sailing experience in ship. Good place for kids. You can also buy some souvenirs from museum.
You Li (14 months ago)
If you are into boats and history this is an incredible museum. They do “experimental archeology” where they reconstruct the boats and invite visitors to sail them in the fjord. There is an incredible find of 5 real Viking boats that were scuttled in the fjord over 1000 years ago. This museum is very interactive and especially good for kids or those who are young at heart.
Danny MA (15 months ago)
The sailing in a reconstructed ship is a wonderful experience as is the tour of the reconstructed ships, tying knots, floating your own ships. It would be nice if there was a larger quantity and variety of tools for making model ships though. The staff are very nice and great at explaining how everything works and the historical facts.
Rike K (15 months ago)
An amazing experience! The entrance is included in the Copenhagen card, so we spontaneously decided to have a gasp. We stayed for two hours, especially watching a viking boat replica being built. There is much to not only see but also to touch and try out. Highly recommended!
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