Viking Ship Museum

Roskilde, Denmark

The Viking Ship Museum (Vikingeskibsmuseet) is the Danish national museum for ships, seafaring and boatbuilding in the prehistoric and medieval period.

Around the year 1070, five Viking ships were deliberately sunk at Skuldelev in Roskilde Fjord in order to block the most important fairway and to protect Roskilde from enemy attack from the sea. These ships, later known as the Skuldelev ships, were excavated in 1962. They turned out to be five different types of ships ranging from cargo ships to ships of war.

The Viking Ship Museum overlooks Roskilde Fjord and was built in 1969 especially to exhibit the five newly-discovered ships. In the late 1990s excavations for an expansion of the museum uncovered a further 9 ships including the longest Viking warship ever discovered, at 36 metres.

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Category: Museums in Denmark

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mike B (2 months ago)
If visiting Denmark, it is not far from Copenhagen. Overall a nice size museum, plus outdoor activities for children and even active restoration of Viking ship. We did not do the sailing, but it looked quite nice, reservations are needed in advance.
Pietro Splatters (9 months ago)
Not very big or with many things to see, but good text and story to read. It's worth a visit, if you've 1 hours free here around.
Riikka V (10 months ago)
I would highly recommend the guided tour, it was the highlight of our visit. The tour guide was very knowledgeable and casual which made it very enjoyable (thanks Emile!)
Piotr Król (11 months ago)
Wonderful place. Very good exhibitions and activities (take a Viking boat and try to sail through the fjord!) Perfect Tour guides!
Elisabeth Wyffels (11 months ago)
Nice museum but it could be a bit more interactive. A lot of information to read. The tour in the vikingship was a nice experience and highly recommended.
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