Roskilde Palace

Roskilde, Denmark

Roskilde Mansion replaced a bishop's palace which had stood at the site since the Middle Ages. Commissioned by King Christian VI, the new building was constructed to provide a residence for the royal family when they passed through the city or attended royal funerals and other ceremonies in Roskilde Cathedral. Lauritz de Thurah who had recently been engaged as royal master builder, was charged with its design in 1733 and the palace was completed in 1736.

During the English siege of Copenhagen in 1807, the mansion served as headquarters of general Wellesley, the future Duke of Wellington. Later in the century, it provided a venue for the so-called Assembly of the Estates, a key event leading up to the adoption of the Danish constitution in 1849.

Built in the Baroque style, in yellow-washed masonry and with red tile roofs, the four-winged complex consists of a two-storey main wing, two one-storey lateral wings and a curved gate wing opening to the Stændertorvet. The four wings are connected by curving galleries. Facing the courtyard, the facade of the main wing has pilasters and a median risalit tipped by a triangular pediment decorated with the royal coat of arms. Dating from the 13th century, the Gate of Absalon which connects the mansion to the apsis of Roskilde Cathedral, is the only surviving part of the former bishop's palace.

Since 1924, one of the wings has been home to the office and official residence of the Bishop of Roskilde. The rest of the complex houses Roskilde Museum of Contemporary Art, founded in 1991, as well as Roskilde Art Association and the Palace Collections. The mansion's gardens and courtyard are also used for exhibitions, concerts and other cultural events.

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Details

Founded: 1733-1736
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bo Andersen (2 years ago)
Contemporary art will never be my cup of tea, but it is also an art to sell these installations to foundations and curators, so that those who will be surprised can benefit from the "artist's" idea. so it ... well but the buildings and their history itself are amazing.
Larisa Šinkovec (3 years ago)
Not anything spectacular. However if you are in Roskilde you should stop by.
David Kemp (3 years ago)
Great staff, minimal art.
Ole Witthøft (3 years ago)
Experience the exhibition Bjerget Synger. It is an important and relevant greeting from nature to us humans.
Anders Johansen (4 years ago)
Man mærker historien
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