Frederiksborg Palace

Hillerød, Denmark

Frederiksborg Palace was built as a royal residence for King Christian IV and is now a museum of national history. The current edifice replaced a previous castle erected by Frederick II and is the largest Renaissance palace in Scandinavia. The palace is located on three small islands in the middle of Palace Lake (Slotsøen) and is adjoined by a large formal garden in the Baroque style.

The oldest parts of the castle date back to the 1560 structure built by Frederick II. Although he remains its namesake, most of the current palace was instead constructed by Christian IV between 1602 and 1620. He employed the Flemish architects Hans and Lorenz van Steenwinckel and the castle follows the Dutch style employed by Christian IV for his new buildings in Copenhagen. After Christian IV's death in 1648, the palace was used mainly for ceremonial events.

The church has also been used as the knight's chapel for the Order of the Elephant and the Order of the Dannebrog since 1693; housed the Danish royal family's art collection, notably works on the life of Jesus by Danish painter Carl Heinrich Bloch; and was the site of the 1720 Treaty of Frederiksborg.

In the 1850s, the palace was again used as a residence by King Frederick VII. While he was in residence on the evening of December 16, 1859, a fire destroyed a large part of the main palace's interior. Reconstruction was funded by public subscription, with large contributions from the king and state, as well as the prominent philanthropist J. C. Jacobsen of the Carlsberg Brewery. Jacobsen also funded the museum of national history that now occupies Frederiksborg.

The Palace Church or Chapel of Orders serves as a local church today and is a part of the museum on the premises. The coats-of-arms of recipients of the Order of the Elephantand of the Dannebrog are displayed on the walls of the church. The museum houses an important collection of portraits and historical paintings.

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Details

Founded: 1560-1620
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kasper Thystrup Karstensen (3 months ago)
A fine exhibition with countless paintings of Danish historical impact. There was decent entertainment for the younger kids, yet there might have been a bit more focus on more hands-on activity for the younger. Could not find a café close to the exhibition area, so make sure to bring your own refreshments.
Franco Cipolla (3 months ago)
Amazingly scenic and truly beautiful castle. Located in Hillerød, it’s somewhat far from the countries capital of Copenhagen, but you can get there via train quite easily. The castle is huge and surrounded by a lake, making it truly magical. If you like old architecture, particularly royal architecture and palaces you’ll enjoy this place. Definitely worth going out of the capital to get there.
iris (5 months ago)
Nice castle with nice paintings, however most information about it was in Danish. The garden is pretty too. We arrived at 16.15 and they were closing at 17.00 and while walking around the castle they already put out some of the lights in some rooms which was a shame, since they were still open for half an hour. The cellars are closed due to corona.
Marc V. (5 months ago)
The castle completely burned in 1859, meaning that almost nothing original has left apart from the outer walls - which were partly under restauration. Lots of the interior decoration was restored, but this still gives a different feel. The castle has been converted into a big museum, mostly of paintings from the royal family which have been saved from the fire. It was one of the less interesting visits of Denmark.
Anton Bodbijl (5 months ago)
This castle is a really worth to pay a visit. The building is nice to see. But there is also much to see about the history of Denmark. Many paintings and furniture. Too much to see in one day. You can visit the park as well this is for free.
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