Frederiksborg Palace

Hillerød, Denmark

Frederiksborg Palace was built as a royal residence for King Christian IV and is now a museum of national history. The current edifice replaced a previous castle erected by Frederick II and is the largest Renaissance palace in Scandinavia. The palace is located on three small islands in the middle of Palace Lake (Slotsøen) and is adjoined by a large formal garden in the Baroque style.

The oldest parts of the castle date back to the 1560 structure built by Frederick II. Although he remains its namesake, most of the current palace was instead constructed by Christian IV between 1602 and 1620. He employed the Flemish architects Hans and Lorenz van Steenwinckel and the castle follows the Dutch style employed by Christian IV for his new buildings in Copenhagen. After Christian IV's death in 1648, the palace was used mainly for ceremonial events.

The church has also been used as the knight's chapel for the Order of the Elephant and the Order of the Dannebrog since 1693; housed the Danish royal family's art collection, notably works on the life of Jesus by Danish painter Carl Heinrich Bloch; and was the site of the 1720 Treaty of Frederiksborg.

In the 1850s, the palace was again used as a residence by King Frederick VII. While he was in residence on the evening of December 16, 1859, a fire destroyed a large part of the main palace's interior. Reconstruction was funded by public subscription, with large contributions from the king and state, as well as the prominent philanthropist J. C. Jacobsen of the Carlsberg Brewery. Jacobsen also funded the museum of national history that now occupies Frederiksborg.

The Palace Church or Chapel of Orders serves as a local church today and is a part of the museum on the premises. The coats-of-arms of recipients of the Order of the Elephantand of the Dannebrog are displayed on the walls of the church. The museum houses an important collection of portraits and historical paintings.

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Details

Founded: 1560-1620
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Githa Skea-Thuesen (21 months ago)
My favourite castle and castle gardens in Denmark - brag about this place to foreign visitors and locals alike. Partial renovations in progress, but not obstructive to splendour of primary view.
Chris Smith (21 months ago)
Are you super interested in big drafty castles where people pretty out-of-touch with any sense of reality played dress up and had parties? This is the place for you! There's a lot of really great artwork inside and that's worth the visit for those of us who roll our eyes at the whole royalty thing. As with everywhere else in Denmark, there's no place in here where you can find a frosty beverage to sip on while you take it all in and they probably wouldn't let you stroll through sipping one of the lukewarm sodas that you can get to drink. I guess I sound like a curmudgeon here but I honestly really enjoy seeing things of historical significance but I lean way harder toward significant world history than I do toward lifestyles of the dead rich and famous.
Teresa Cuba (21 months ago)
Amazing castle, close to Copenhagen, by train or car. It is extremely well maintained and the gardens are beautiful. You can spend the whole day there, totally worth the visit!
Kim Skak Larsen (2 years ago)
It's a pretty cool castle. It looks just right with towers, green roofs, a mote, gardens, etc. The national historic museum inside the castle was interesting, though there's a limit to how long portraits of old aristocrats can keep my attention.
Doncho Angelov (2 years ago)
Great place to visit. You can see how Danish Royal family spent their time, while they lived in this castle. Many preserved rooms will tell you about times, when people were shorter and hungrier, but still there were three ones, who had it all. Beautiful halls, impressive garden, astonishing beauty. One of my favorite places to visit, when in Copenhagen. A bit too far from the city, you need at least half a day to enjoy it.
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