Maglarp Church was built around 1200 and is one of the oldest brick churches in Sweden. Arhaeological evidences reveal that there has been probably a stave church on the church site before. Maglarp Church medieval exterior is very well-preserved.

The oldest inventory is a font dating from the 1200s. The crucifix is also medieval from the 1400s. The beautiful Renaissance pulpit from 1568 is the oldest in Scania region.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Address

633, Trelleborg, Sweden
See all sites in Trelleborg

Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sandra Eliasson (5 months ago)
Very nice old church
Ragnhild Knutsson (2 years ago)
Nice old church
Madeleine Andersson (3 years ago)
Beautiful, VERY old church. Met church hosts, a woman who generously shared with her about the history of the church, even though she would actually lock and go home.
Attilla Juhász (4 years ago)
Kan inte ge den sämre betyg eftersom jag gifte mig där, kyrkan andas historia helt igenom med både Dansk och Svensk stavning på gravstenarna i golvet.
Attilla Juhász (4 years ago)
Can not give it a worse rating because I got married there, the church breathes history throughout with both Danish and Swedish spelling on the tombstones in the floor.
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