Amalienborg is the winter home of the Danish royal family. It consists of four identical classicizing palace façades with rococo interiors around an octagonal courtyard; in the centre of the square is a monumental equestrian statue of Amalienborg's founder, King Frederick V.

Amalienborg was originally built for four noble families; however, when Christiansborg Palace burnt down on 26 February 1794, the royal family bought the palaces and moved in. Over the years various kings and their families have resided in the four different palaces. Amalienborg is the centrepiece of Frederiksstaden, a district that was built by King Frederick V to commemorate in 1748 the tercentenary of the Oldenburg family's ascent to the throne of Denmark, and in 1749 the tercentenary of the coronation of Christian I of Denmark. This development is generally thought to have been the brainchild of DanishAmbassador Plenipotentiary in Paris, Johann Hartwig Ernst Bernstorff. Heading the project was Lord High Steward Adam Gottlob Moltke, one of the most powerful and influential men in the land, with Nicolai Eigtved as royal architect and supervisor.

According to Eigtved’s master plans for Frederikstad and the Amalienborg Palaces, the four palaces surrounding the plaza were conceived of as town mansions for the families of chosen nobility. They were identical from the outside, but different on the inside. The building site for each palace was donated free of charge to the chosen aristocrat to build on, and they were further exempted from taxes and duties. The only conditions were that the palaces should comply exactly to the Frederikstad architectural specifications, and that they should be built within a specified time framework.

Building of the palaces on the western side of the square started in 1750. When Eigtved died in 1754 the two western palaces had been completed. The work on the other palaces was continued by Eigtved's colleague and rival, Lauritz de Thurah strictly according to Eigtved’s plans. The palaces were completed in 1760.

The four palaces are: Christian VII's Palace, (originally known as Moltke's Palace), Christian VIII's Palace (Levetzau's Palace), Frederick VIII's Palace (Brockdorff's Palace) and Christian IX's Palace (Schack's Palace).

Currently, only the palaces of Christian VII and Christian VIII are open to the public.

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Founded: 1750-1760
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

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User Reviews

Lex Universe (2 months ago)
One of the official residences of the Danish monarch and the royal family, this palace in the historic center of Copenhagen is one of the most favorite tourist spots. Entrance fee is 50 DKK and allows you to enter two of four of the palaces. There is the statue Frederick V.'s statue and also worth visiting is neighboring St. Christian church with its marvelous dome.
Adam Kramarczyk (8 months ago)
Excellent.
Manninson Burn (8 months ago)
We saw the parade outside the palace . Elegant guards in uniforms performed in a show just in the garden . Suggestive inside and very “ classy “ ?
Joshua Flint (9 months ago)
Worth a visit, the place is well kept and clean, but really not all that much to see or do. The changing of the guards might be of interest to some.
Dr. Iram Khan (9 months ago)
It is a royal palace of immaculate beauty. With the Frederik Church in the background and the Black Diamond at the front, there is something of composure, peace and permanance about the place, that bestows certain serenity to it. It is definitely worth a visit if one is traveling to the city of Copenhagen.
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