The Little Mermaid (Den lille havfrue) is a bronze statue depicting a mermaid. Based on the fairy tale of the same name by Hans Christian Andersen, the small and unimposing statue is a Copenhagen icon and has been a major tourist attraction since 1913. It has become a popular target for defacement by vandals and political activists.

The statue was commissioned in 1909 by Carl Jacobsen, son of the founder of Carlsberg, who had been fascinated by a ballet about the fairytale in Copenhagen's Royal Theatre and asked the ballerina, Ellen Price, to model for the statue. The sculptor Edvard Eriksen created the bronze statue, which was unveiled on 23 August 1913. The statue's head was modelled after Price, but as the ballerina did not agree to model in the nude, the sculptor's wife, Eline Eriksen, was used for the body.

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Founded: 1913
Category: Statues in Denmark

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Lansing (18 months ago)
Cool statue, not too large, but it's nice to look at. I went in winter so it wasn't crowded. Keep walking up the pier and go out to the end, it's very beautiful out there, you can see very far into the horizon/water/offshore wind farm. Cool area, fun for a bike ride
Sudiharto Suwowo (2 years ago)
Not much effort to go there. it I went in the morning and the weather was so nice. The statue actually is not special (I should admit this!) but the way to the statue is nice and beautiful. I recommend u to use bicycle.
Chetan L (2 years ago)
The actual statue in itself is a little underwhelming, but the place as a whole is a nice spot to spend time. Have the right expectations and you can enjoy your visit here. Be prepared to be facing a bus load of tourists. Best would be to visit earthy in the morning and avoid the crowds
Marcelo Tardío (2 years ago)
It is an interesting state located at the end of a very nice promenade. The statue get famous since its unveiling in 1913. It is based on the fairy tale of the same name by Danish author Hans Christian Andersen, the small and unimposing statue is a Copenhagen icon and it is a major tourist attraction.
Kim Terrell (2 years ago)
I cant recommend going out of your way to see this statue, but if you are close by or determined to see it, the walk there is beautiful. And the statue is cool. However, it is tiny, and a tourist trap. So you will be surrounded by lots of other people trying to get a look. Copenhagen is full of amazing statues, even a full size replica of the David statue. The mermaid statue was not any more amazing than all the others.
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