The Church of Holmen (Holmens Kirke) was first built as an anchor forge in 1563 and converted into a naval church by Christian IV. It is famous for having hosted the wedding between Margrethe II of Denmark, current queen of Denmark, and Prince Henrik in 1967. It is the burial site of such notabilities as naval heroes Niels Juel and Peter Tordenskjold, and composer Niels Wilhelm Gade, and contains artwork by, among others, Bertel Thorvaldsen and Karel van Mander.

The appearance of the Church of Holmen today closely resembles that of the renovation in 1872, except for the colour. The windows are in clear glass and predominantly set in iron. The spire is dressed in copper just like small spire on the confessional's roof. The church is of Lutheran denomination.

The church's pipe organ was originally made by Lambert Daniel Kastens and installed in 1738, and the facade remains in place today. The actual organ, however, is from 1956. The current pulpit was installed in 1662 and was carved by Abel Schrøder and stands in the natural colour of its oak, except for the king's monogram which is gilded. It is the oldest preserved pulpit in Copenhagen, and the most richly decorated. It stands from floor to ceiling, and depicts Christian history from Moses holding the basket up to Jesus Christ.

The oldest baptismal font in the church is in wrought iron and stands 117 cm tall. A white marble font was installed in 1756, created by Carl Frederik Stanley in classicist style, but is no longer in the church. The new baptismal font from 1872 was made by the sculptor Evens by Ludvig Fenger's design, in black marble and sandstone. A model of Niels Juel's ship Christianus Quintus hangs from the ceiling in the church.

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Details

Founded: 1563
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

pvares (2 years ago)
Beautiful church.
李小乐 (2 years ago)
Really nice church to walk by.
Anders Hostmark (3 years ago)
Beautiful church - came to pay homage to "Tordenskjold" by his tomb. Very close walk to other many historical sites worth visiting.
Eyrie (4 years ago)
The right spot for classical concert. If you are up to Mozart, I strongly recommend to go around.
Lee Cherry (4 years ago)
A group of small islands that was once the site of the Royal Naval Base, after it was relocated from Bremerholm at the end of the 17th century. Now it is open to the public and offers some really great views on the city.
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