Blomsholm Stone Ship

Blomsholm, Sweden

Blomsholm stone ship is one of the oldest in Sweden, more than 40 metres long with 49 stones. The bow and stern are about 4 metres high and dates from the early Scandinavian Iron Age (c. 400 - 600 AD). The size and prominent position of the grave shows that an important person must be buried here. There are also several other large megaliths in the area; Another stone circle and menhirs (Neolithic age) stand in the wood near the viking-ship shaped stone circle.

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Address

1055, Blomsholm, Sweden
See all sites in Blomsholm

Details

Founded: 400 - 600 AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Sweden
Historical period: Migration Period (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pete Colman (3 years ago)
Great find in the countryside with an aire
richard albert (3 years ago)
First of all, this is an ancient monument and not a 'museum '. It is quite recent by megalithic standards, being variously dated to around the 6th century AD. As a consequence, the menhirs are in good, although not pristine condition. The grounds are well kept. It also presents itself pretty much unchanged from its original construction, unlike Neolithic monuments in Britain and in Europe in general which are far older and have experienced a great amount of evolution and turmoil. Well worth a stop, even if stone circles, quoits and henges are not among one's primary interests.
Fred Mathys (3 years ago)
Nice walk in the nature with historical monuments to see
marcin rich (3 years ago)
Magic place.
Charles Lau (4 years ago)
While driving from Oslo to Gothenburg, we made a stop here to see the Iron Age ship-shaped stone circle. Across the road and up the slope there is also an Iron Age grave field. According to the information board, both the stone ship and the grave field were built before 600AD, when the sea was 5m higher than the current level and the stone ship overlooked a sheltered bay. This historical site is conveniently accessible from the motorway and there was nobody at the site when we were there.
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