Gräfsnäs Castle Ruins

Sollebrunn, Sweden

Gräfsnäs Castle today consists of a heavily restored main building with barred windows and surrounding dry moat. The ruins are remnants of the original palatial fortress built in Swedish-French Renaissance style. The castle, which met with such a tragic fate, was constructed in c. 1571 and belonged to many different owners (like Leijonhufvud, Sparre and Holstein-Augustenburg families) before it was finally abandoned in the late 19th century. The tragic coincidence was that Gräfsnäs was damaged by fire in every one hundred years (1634, 1734 and 1834).

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Details

Founded: c. 1571
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

www.alingsas.se

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eric Jeurissen (3 years ago)
Very nice green environment, bbq possibilities and swimming / beach-like area. Nice ancient wooden houses
H Baramakeh (3 years ago)
Swedish historical place, nice place to see
Lars Andersson (3 years ago)
Ubuntu
averno schaller (4 years ago)
A very beautiful castle ruin that is surrounded by a park and forest. If you go to the south of the park you have a magnificent view over the lake Anten. You can walk down to the lake for a swim or just take a nice walk.
Olav van Gerven (7 years ago)
The ancient ruin of the castle in Gräfsnäs, Sollebrunn, is located at the end of a small road. Since we visited the place more then ten years ago for the first time, a local group of people have put a lot of effords to make the ruin accesable to the public. There is sufficient parkingspace close to the area. In close distance to the ruin, there is a swimmingarea and a small restaurant. If you ar not interested in the ruin itself, you can leave your car at the parkinglot and go for a walk or just sit on one of the benches at the lake and enjoy the view.
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