Alingsås Museum

Alingsås, Sweden

The industrial history of Alingsås began in 1724 when Jonas Alström established there a factory. The factory had 1,000 employees already in the mid-18th century. The Alströmerska warehouse at the Lilla Torget is the city’s oldest secular building. It was built in the beginning of the 1730s and is the only property left from the Alströmerska époque. The building was first used by Jonas Alströmer to house materials used in manufacturing. In 1928 the museum took over the building and at first shared it with the library that is now located next door.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.
  • Alingsås Idag

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Details

Founded: 1730s
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Eriksson (2 years ago)
Interesting also for my grandchildren.
Camilla Blad (2 years ago)
Worth visiting, nice exhibitions.
Erik Elmgren (2 years ago)
Alingsås Museum has started to be a museum again to my great joy. They have a nice exhibition about water right now is highly recommended. Waiting for it to be a museum again on all levels and for you to get Alingsås history into the museum again where it does not belong packed in a warehouse.
Nils-Eric Larsson (5 years ago)
Detta är en bortglömd pärla.
Niranjan Singh (5 years ago)
Mycket fint och trevligt museum. Trevlig och kunnig personal. Rekommenderas.
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