Kong Asgers Høj

Stege, Denmark

Kong Asgers Høj (King Asgers Mound) is a large passage grave on the island of Møn. It was built in the Late Stone Age (3000 BC - 1500 BC) and has a 10 meters long narrow passage leading into to the grave chamber. The grave chamber is 10 meters long and 2 meters wide and was when in use a common grave. When somebody died the grave was opened, the deceased was buried, and the grave was closed again. Kong Asgers Høj is situated to the Northwest of Sprove on a small hill. The passage grave is open to the public, but it is a good thing to bring some sort of light because the grave chamber is pitch-dark.

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Details

Founded: 3000-1500 BC
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Denmark
Historical period: Neolithic Age (Denmark)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

sophie b (3 years ago)
No real interest because the galleries are closed
sophie b (3 years ago)
No real interest because the galleries are closed
Claus Haugelund (4 years ago)
Langroet (4 years ago)
Marie Chaumaz (4 years ago)
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