Marstal Church was built in 1738 and extended in 1772. Seven votive ships indicate the growth of shipping in the town from the 18th to the 20th century. The font dates from the Middle Ages. Carl Rasmussen, a maritime artist who usually specialized in the motifs of Greenland, painted the 1881 altarpiece, depicting Christ stilling a storm. In the old churchyard are memorials and tombstones honoring the sailors of Marstal who died at sea during two world wars.

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Details

Founded: 1738
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kirsten Boutrup (12 months ago)
A quiet place you should come a little more when you have time.
Per T (14 months ago)
Beautiful sailor church
Vilhelm Rothe (2 years ago)
Beautiful church filled with church ships, which is probably also expected for a church in Marstal ?.
Kim Jensen (2 years ago)
Got a tour of Knud Nielsen and he told some wonderful stories about the church and on our trip afterwards to the harbor.
Lisa Thiel (3 years ago)
Ok
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