Egeskov Castle is Europe"s best preserved Renaissance water castle with a history dating to the 14th century. The castle structure was erected by Frands Brockenhuus in 1554. Due to the troubles caused by the civil war known as the Count"s Feud, general civil unrest, and a civil war introducing the Protestant Reformation, most Danish noblemen built their homes as fortifications. The castle is constructed on oaken piles and located in a small lake with a maximum depth of 5 metres. Originally, the only access was by means of a drawbridge. According to legend, it took an entire forest of oak trees to build the foundation, hence the name Egeskov (“oak forest”).

The castle consists of two long buildings connected by a thick double wall, allowing defenders to abandon one house and continue fighting from the other. The double wall is over one meter thick and contains secret staircases and a well. Defenders were able to attack an enemy"s flanks from the two round corner towers. Other medieval defences include artillery ports, scalding holes and arrow slits. The bricks composing the castle are of an oversized medieval type sometimes called 'monks bricks'. The conical towers are constructed in a series of separate panels.

The architecture includes depressed and round-arched windows, round-arched blank arcading within the gables, and a double string course between the high cellar and the ground floor. The structure contains some of the early indoor plumbing design first used in Europe with vertical shafts for waste. The thick double wall also contains a water well which is accessed from the servants kitchen in the east house. Several of the large rooms have massive parallel exposed beams with some end carving.

Contents of the castle include a massive iron chest from at least as early as the 16th century, which derived from Hvedholm Castle, a property earlier owned by the Egeskov estate about ten kilometers to the west.

Numerous oil paintings are found within the castle including a large painting in the great hall on the first floor of Niels Juel, who defeated the Swedish force in the Battle of Køge Bay in the year 1677.

Other buildings belonging to Egeskov include Ladegården, a thatched half-timbered building which is now part of the museum. Other buildings are used by the museum and for farming. Surrounding the castle is an old park, covering 20 hectares of land. The park is divided into a number of gardens. The renaissance garden features fountains, a gravel path and topiary figures. The fuchsia garden, one of the largest in Europe, contains 104 different species. Other gardens near the castle include an English garden, a water garden, an herb garden, a vegetable garden, and a peasant"s garden (bondehave). The gardens also feature four hedge mazes. The oldest is a beech maze several hundreds of years old. This garden is trimmed every year to prevent the trees from dying. The newest maze is the world"s largest bamboo maze. It features a Chinese tower in the centre, and a bridge from the tower provides the exit from the maze. The parks feature a three-meter-tall sundial designed by Danish poet and mathematician, Piet Hein.

The estate includes an additional eight square kilometres; 2.5 square kilometres is forest, with the rest being farmland. The estate has belonged to the Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Bille family since 1784. In 1986, a full-sized replica of the castle was built in Hokkaidō, Japan, to hold anaquarium. This was constructed with the permission of the Egeskov"s owners at the time, Count Claus and Countess Louisa Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Bille.

Egeskov is today a home to the several museums, like vintage automobile, motorcycle and flying vehicles collection. Most of the castle is open to the public, except for the areas used by Count Michael and Countess Caroline Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Bille. The museum of agriculture and the horse wagon collection is located in the building Ladegård mentioned previously.

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Details

Founded: 1554
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Krisia Justesen (6 months ago)
A wonderful day with the family! My kids love classic cars, planes, and rescue vehicles, so this was like heaven for them! We'll definitely be back in summer so they can enjoy they playgrounds and I can see the gardens.
Divya Golechha (7 months ago)
A great day tour kind of place. They have different museums with such exotic cars, bikes. It is quite interesting if you are a museum person. Castle was closed when we went. They have a nice playground for kids. Overall it was a day well spent. And yeah if you want you can bring your own food and drinks.
Alec Pearson (12 months ago)
Needs to get into the 21st century. And there needs to be better activities for adults. Was fun as a kid in the 90s, but now it just seems old and dated. Though there is loads of potential for reinventing itself
Christian Bierlich (13 months ago)
Nice, clean and new playgrounds. Entrance fee is a bit steep. Don't believe the website when they tell you about their wide selection in food. Bring your own lunch instead.
ForFranceska91 (14 months ago)
Very lovely place. Definitely a whole day of discovery. Don't walk in a straight line, go exploring, you'll find many hidden gems in the gardens. It was 26 C and sunny so wish the second icecream shop was open. Also the cafe with more proper food was closed so only expensive fast food was available. The whole park is very pretty and clean, toilets kept very good ?.
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