Valdemars Castle

Svendborg, Denmark

Valdemars Castle was built by King Christian IV (1588–1648) between 1639 and 1644. It is designed by Hans van Stenwinkel. The king’s plans for his new castle were that the house should become the home for his son Valdemar Christian, who was born to him by Kirstine Munk. King Christian was renowned for his interest in building. On the island of Tåsinge, belonging to his mother in law Ellen Marsvin, the king decided to build a castle for his young son. However, Valdemar Christian never moved in. He was killed in battle in Poland in 1656.

In 1678 the naval hero, Admiral Niels Juel, was given title to the castle and the land on Tåsinge after his victory over Sweden in the Battle of Køge Bay in 1677. The estate was transferred to him as payment for the Swedish ships captured in the battle.

The present owner, Baron Iuel-Brockdorff, who is 11th generation of the Juel family, took over his childhood home from his father in 1971 and lives in the castle with his wife and family. Valdemars Slot has been open to the public since 1974. The castle is open from May to October and on public holidays. The castle features a large chapel, a toy museum, the Iuel-Brockdorff family's big game trophy collection and a local maritime museum. As the castle lies near the beach, it is popular for visitors to come by ferry on the Helge from Svendborg.

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Details

Founded: 1639-1644
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Søren Fog (20 months ago)
Beautiful area and scenery around this old estate. It is also a place for concerts during summertime. Outside the rock-n-roll season it's a great place to visit for some relaxing hikes along the coast and in the forests
Jeroen Groen (2 years ago)
It was closed and the website does not show that, such a waste of my skattepenge
Jurate Stankuviene (2 years ago)
Absolutely amazing, very different experience from ordinary castle museums. Elegant, cosy, beautiful. You feel more like a guest than the visitor.
Paul Sol (2 years ago)
The scenery is magnificent. Higly reccomend a trip there
Johannes Rummel (3 years ago)
It's very nice to just drive there (trees on both sides of the road) and then you can drive right through the chateau with the car (but not stop there). I didn't go inside, so can't say whether that's worth it.
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