Le Dolmen du Couperon is a Chalcolithic (3250 - 2250BC), 8m long capstoned chamber surrounded by a ring of 18 curb stones known as a 'peristalith'. Originally covered by a long mound what remains today is largely the work of restorers. When first excavated in 1868 the capstones had fallen into the chamber. These stones, including a porthole stone were lifted and placed as capstones. In 1919 the Société Jersiaise removed the porthole stone which had been incorrectly placed as a capstone and moved it to its current position at the eastern end of the chamber. Finds included a few flint flakes and pottery fragments.

The adjacent Le Couperon Guardhouse was built in 1689 of local stone, with brick lintels. It supported a battery on the headland above as a magazine and shelter for the members of the Jersey militia that served the battery. The battery commanded Rozel Bay and by 1812 consisted of two 24-pounder muzzle-loading guns that fired over a low wall, which has long disappeared.

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Founded: 3250 - 2250 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

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User Reviews

Add Sheridan (2 years ago)
Great views. Very relaxing.
Add Sheridan (2 years ago)
Great views. Very relaxing.
Michael Officer (2 years ago)
These shots are taken as near as makes no difference to the Couperon. This area has it all. Fiercely difficult to find and when you get there you are so rewarded. Do not attempt to get there in a Chelsea Tractor, V small vehicles, bicycles or foot will suit the typical Jersey highway to this place.
Michael Officer (2 years ago)
These shots are taken as near as makes no difference to the Couperon. This area has it all. Fiercely difficult to find and when you get there you are so rewarded. Do not attempt to get there in a Chelsea Tractor, V small vehicles, bicycles or foot will suit the typical Jersey highway to this place.
Piotr Tomaszewski (2 years ago)
You should visit this place not only for a neolithic history but for an amazing view too.
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