Le Dolmen du Couperon is a Chalcolithic (3250 - 2250BC), 8m long capstoned chamber surrounded by a ring of 18 curb stones known as a 'peristalith'. Originally covered by a long mound what remains today is largely the work of restorers. When first excavated in 1868 the capstones had fallen into the chamber. These stones, including a porthole stone were lifted and placed as capstones. In 1919 the Société Jersiaise removed the porthole stone which had been incorrectly placed as a capstone and moved it to its current position at the eastern end of the chamber. Finds included a few flint flakes and pottery fragments.

The adjacent Le Couperon Guardhouse was built in 1689 of local stone, with brick lintels. It supported a battery on the headland above as a magazine and shelter for the members of the Jersey militia that served the battery. The battery commanded Rozel Bay and by 1812 consisted of two 24-pounder muzzle-loading guns that fired over a low wall, which has long disappeared.

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Founded: 3250 - 2250 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

c gardner (5 months ago)
Not much here bar the stones but a good stop on a coast walk. There is an excellent viewing spot from a bench almost hidden from view a little above the stones on the cliff edge. You can reach the dolmen by car and parking on a rough ground some 30 yards away. Quite a peaceful place and easy to reach from Rozel campsite. The stones are not that tall and come up to about waist height, some photos almost suggest you could walk thru the arches created by the stack but not the case.
Gary Middlemiss (5 months ago)
Small beach. No parking really if busy. Better beaches nearby.
Jimmy Gray (8 months ago)
Quiet tranquil out of the way bay, down a narrow windy hill. Away from the commotion of the daily hussle and bussle of Jersey life!
Daniel Rive (9 months ago)
The Island of Jersey has many Neolithic sites, its an Island of great pre -historical importance.
DreamTech Oz (13 months ago)
A great Dolmen! Well worth a visit. The views of the coast are breathtaking. The road to get here is quite steep, so make sure your breaks are working!
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