Battery Lothringen was a World War II coastal artillery battery in Saint Brélade. It was constructed by Organisation Todt for the Wehrmacht during the Occupation of the Channel Islands. The first installations were completed in 1941, around the same time as the completion of the nearby Battery Moltke, in St. Ouen. The battery site is located at the end of Noirmont Point, a rock headland which overlooks St. Aubin's Bay, Elizabeth Castle, and the harbours of Saint Helier. It was a part of the Atlantic Wall system of coastal fortifications, and most of the concrete structures remain today. The 3rd Battery of Naval Artillery Battalion 604 were stationed here. The site overlooks the 19th century Martello tower of La Tour de Vinde. This is the black and white tower visible in the photo to the right. The tower is painted to serve as a daymark. There is no easy footpath from the battery to the tower.

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Founded: 1941
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Donnie Johnston (2 months ago)
Great place to visit
Ann Roberts (5 months ago)
A fascinating history of part of the work some of the 13,000 German Prisoners of War in Jersey were forced to perform in building these gun emplacements. They are an education of this part of the occupation. Well worth a visit.
James Kimbley (15 months ago)
Interestingly historic place with fabulous views.
Colin Wallace (21 months ago)
A large WWII site worth visiting
Angus Smith (2 years ago)
Interesting walk with great sea views and many WW2 German bunkers to explore
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