Battery Lothringen was a World War II coastal artillery battery in Saint Brélade. It was constructed by Organisation Todt for the Wehrmacht during the Occupation of the Channel Islands. The first installations were completed in 1941, around the same time as the completion of the nearby Battery Moltke, in St. Ouen. The battery site is located at the end of Noirmont Point, a rock headland which overlooks St. Aubin's Bay, Elizabeth Castle, and the harbours of Saint Helier. It was a part of the Atlantic Wall system of coastal fortifications, and most of the concrete structures remain today. The 3rd Battery of Naval Artillery Battalion 604 were stationed here. The site overlooks the 19th century Martello tower of La Tour de Vinde. This is the black and white tower visible in the photo to the right. The tower is painted to serve as a daymark. There is no easy footpath from the battery to the tower.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1941
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simon Crampin (11 months ago)
Included as part of coastal walk , well worth the visit.
Michelle Shreeves (11 months ago)
Great place and views
Geoff Bizouarn (14 months ago)
A superb example of a network of WW2 German defence bunkers
Dave Blissett-Williams (15 months ago)
An amazing slice of the islands and WW2 history. The bunker complex has been lovingly preserved in an exact state as it was when the Germans left in 1945. The exhibits on show are all authentic and add to the atmosphere of the complex and what daily life must have been like. In addition there are stunning views and scenery that give clear views across the sea, perfect for a picnic. The sunsets are also stunning in the evening making it the perfect location to spend an entire day at this wonderful location.
Peter Ditch (18 months ago)
Fantastic WW2 German military bunker complex. Very interesting and the Bunkers have been restored to a very high standard. I return every year congratulations to Paul and all the volunteers for there work and effort
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Stavanger Cathedral

Stavanger Cathedral is Norway's oldest cathedral. Bishop Reinald, who may have come from Winchester, is said to have started construction of the Cathedral around 1100. It was finished around 1150, and the city of Stavanger counts 1125 as its year of foundation. The Cathedral was consecrated to Swithin as its patron saint. Saint Swithun was an early Bishop of Winchester and subsequently patron saint of Winchester Cathedral. Stavanger was ravaged by fire in 1272, and the Cathedral suffered heavy damage. It was rebuilt under bishop Arne, and the Romanesque Cathedral was enlarged in the Gothic style.

In 1682, king Christian V decided to move Stavanger's episcopal seat to Kristiansand. However, on Stavanger's 800th anniversary in 1925, king Haakon VII instated Jacob Christian Petersen as Stavanger's first bishop in nearly 250 years.During a renovation in the 1860s, the Cathedral's exterior and interior was considerably altered. The stone walls were plastered, and the Cathedral lost much of its medieval looks. A major restoration led by Gerhard Fischer in 1939-1964 partly reversed those changes. The latest major restoration of the Cathedral was conducted in 1999. Andrew Lawrenceson Smith is famous for his works here.