Battery Lothringen was a World War II coastal artillery battery in Saint Brélade. It was constructed by Organisation Todt for the Wehrmacht during the Occupation of the Channel Islands. The first installations were completed in 1941, around the same time as the completion of the nearby Battery Moltke, in St. Ouen. The battery site is located at the end of Noirmont Point, a rock headland which overlooks St. Aubin's Bay, Elizabeth Castle, and the harbours of Saint Helier. It was a part of the Atlantic Wall system of coastal fortifications, and most of the concrete structures remain today. The 3rd Battery of Naval Artillery Battalion 604 were stationed here. The site overlooks the 19th century Martello tower of La Tour de Vinde. This is the black and white tower visible in the photo to the right. The tower is painted to serve as a daymark. There is no easy footpath from the battery to the tower.

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Founded: 1941
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

James Kimbley (10 months ago)
Interestingly historic place with fabulous views.
Colin Wallace (16 months ago)
A large WWII site worth visiting
Angus Smith (2 years ago)
Interesting walk with great sea views and many WW2 German bunkers to explore
Michelle Barrett (2 years ago)
Beautiful views can see for miles easy to get to plenty of parking
claire Sales (2 years ago)
Well maintained and a really interesting walk. I wish I could have made it when the bunkers were open. Hopefully I'll be back! Thanks and great work to all the people who keep this area so accessible. Lots of informative plaques.
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