Battery Lothringen

Jersey, United Kingdom

Battery Lothringen was a World War II coastal artillery battery in Saint Brélade. It was constructed by Organisation Todt for the Wehrmacht during the Occupation of the Channel Islands. The first installations were completed in 1941, around the same time as the completion of the nearby Battery Moltke, in St. Ouen. The battery site is located at the end of Noirmont Point, a rock headland which overlooks St. Aubin's Bay, Elizabeth Castle, and the harbours of Saint Helier. It was a part of the Atlantic Wall system of coastal fortifications, and most of the concrete structures remain today. The 3rd Battery of Naval Artillery Battalion 604 were stationed here. The site overlooks the 19th century Martello tower of La Tour de Vinde. This is the black and white tower visible in the photo to the right. The tower is painted to serve as a daymark. There is no easy footpath from the battery to the tower.

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Founded: 1941
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Horton (2 years ago)
Good dog walking area, historical interest, plenty of free parking, great views.
des emmett (2 years ago)
Fantastic history and view along the coast and plaques on the walls to read about
Adam Grimbley (2 years ago)
Another of jerseys / Channel Islands many bunker complexes . We had the opportunity to explore inside on one of cios open days so we saw first hand how it’s been restored
Joaquim van Zoest (2 years ago)
It is free. It has a nice setting and a golden view of the sea. The bunkers have information signs.
robert Le Hegarat (2 years ago)
Very interesting place
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