The Jersey Museum and Art Gallery is located in St Helier. It presents history from 250,000 years ago when the first people arrived in Jersey and continues through the centuries to explore the factors that have shaped this unique island and the people who live there. Find out why Jersey remained loyal to the English Crown despite being so close to France; listen to Jersey-French being spoken; learn about the Island's traditional farming industry and watch fascinating archive footage of the early years of tourism.

On display in the Art Gallery you will find the work of Claude Cahun, recognised worldwide as one of the leading artists of the Surrealist movement. Jersey Museum cares for one of the largest collections of Cahun's work, which comprises photographs, original manuscripts, first editions, books and other personal material. Find out more about Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore.

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Category: Museums in United Kingdom

More Information

www.jerseyheritage.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David and Janet Healey (18 months ago)
Very interesting, giving a good overview of Jersey history. We enjoyed the film of the Jersey story and found the Merchants' House fascinating.
June Haycox (2 years ago)
Had a wonderful day at Jersey Museum. Lots to see. Staff friendly and very helpful.
Ian Pace (2 years ago)
Well presented museum with a mix of audio and video areas alongside the traditional galleries. Great cafe on the ground floor which becomes a restaurant in the evenings. Good video wall showing an aerial tour of the island.
Tim Brown (2 years ago)
A great place to start your visit to Jersey. In the foyer there is a very nice cafe and restaurant. Great cake! There is a film of the landscape of the Island. In a theatre off the foyer there is a very well put together film of the history of Jersey. Well worth seeing. The museum itself covers the history of Jersey and also has an exhibition of 1980s Jersey and Bergerac. Attached is the merchant's house: a very atmospheric interpretation. The whole thing is worth seeing: museum, merchant's house, films, cafe and restaurant.
Martin Oakley (2 years ago)
Regular visitors to the museum when we go to Jersey. The layout and information is superb. The ground floor has changed for us with an excellent aerial photography of the island and better shop. The first floor museum is a brilliant view of the island, occupation years, life at the time and geology. The second floor has a Bergerac exhibition which is fascinating even if you weren't around or a fan of the series. Like all the Jersey Heritage sites on the island they are really well presented.
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