The Jersey Museum and Art Gallery is located in St Helier. It presents history from 250,000 years ago when the first people arrived in Jersey and continues through the centuries to explore the factors that have shaped this unique island and the people who live there. Find out why Jersey remained loyal to the English Crown despite being so close to France; listen to Jersey-French being spoken; learn about the Island's traditional farming industry and watch fascinating archive footage of the early years of tourism.

On display in the Art Gallery you will find the work of Claude Cahun, recognised worldwide as one of the leading artists of the Surrealist movement. Jersey Museum cares for one of the largest collections of Cahun's work, which comprises photographs, original manuscripts, first editions, books and other personal material. Find out more about Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore.

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Category: Museums in United Kingdom

More Information

www.jerseyheritage.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David E Clarke (2 years ago)
Fascinating view of a long interesting history.
Piotr Tomaszewski (2 years ago)
For a small Island like Jersey, it is a quite interesting collections from Neolithic period to today. But I have one question - Where is the Art?
Ian Williams (2 years ago)
It's such an interesting place. Well worth the money and time.
Ian Williams (2 years ago)
It's such an interesting place. Well worth the money and time.
Chris Mawby (2 years ago)
Very good thoroughly enjoyed it £10.60 to. Get in . Very informative Friendly staff
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