The wooden church of Kuru was completed in 1781. It is designed and built by Matti Åkerblom and has 700 seats. In 1848 a sacristy was built on the east side of the church. The altarpiece is painted by B. A. Thule in 1852.

The Kuru Church is a well-preversed and good sample of wooden church architecture in Southwest Finland.

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Details

Founded: 1781
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

More Information

www.phpoint.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Niilo Turunen (2 years ago)
Siisti
teppo nummi (2 years ago)
Pienen kylän pieni puukirkko..
Urho Vuolle (2 years ago)
Aivan uskomaton näyte arkkitehtuurista. Kirkko on aina ollut osana Kurun koulun toimintaa ja on aina järjestänyt toimintaa vanhuksille kuin nuorisolle.
Timo Haavisto (3 years ago)
Yhdeltä suunnalta kirkko on kaunis eli sisäänkäynnin puolelta. Kirkon väritys on onnistunut hyvin. Tapuli on kaunis paanuilla varustettu. Tuosta on jo vuosia kun poikkesin siellä katsomassa, tuolloin maalipinnartkin oli hyvässä kunnossa.
Ahti Rantala (3 years ago)
Pitkästä aikaa konfirmaatio kirkossa juhla jumalanpalvelus,vuosia 50v.rippikoulun käynnistä vuonna 1967.Kiitokset Ylöjärven seurakunnalle!
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