Finlayson ironworks and metallurgy factory was established in 1820 by the Scottish industrialist James Finlayson when he was noticed the energy potential of the free rapids in Tampere. Machine business was not very profitable and Finlayson started to manufacture and weave cotton yarn and textiles. James Finlayson sold the factory to Carl Samuel Nottbeck and Georg Rauch already in 1836. Oldest still existing building, "Kuusvooninkinen" or the "Old Factory", was completed in 1837. It was the first modern industrial building in Finland including for example an automatic sprinkler system.

Finlayson factory extended quickly. In the 1850s it was already the largest factory site Nordic countries. In 1900 Finlayson had nearly 3300 employees and it was a “town inside the town”. Finlayson had its own church, school, ships and electric railway. First electric light in Finland was also turned on in a building called Plevna (1882). Nottbeck family built two magnificent palaces near the factory area.

During the Finnish Civil War in 1918 Tampere was the center of red army. Poor living conditions turned Finlayson and near Tampella factory labour to support the socialism and many of them were joined to red guards. Heavy battles were fought in the factory area and city centre. Plenty of Finlayson workers were died in battles of executed when the white army conquered Tampere.

Finlayson textile business was downsized seriously since the 1980s and manufacturing ended in Tampere in the beginning of the 1990s. Today there are museums, offices, movie theater and shopping centre in old factory buildings. The rapids together with old red-brick factory buildings make the area one of Finland's national heritage landscapes.

Comments

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Risto (SpottingHistory admin) said 9 years ago
Thanks Mari, very good clarification. I updated the description.

Mari from Switzerland said 9 years ago
In your article you mention that James Finlayson is English industrialist, however, I need to correct that he is Scottish.


Details

Founded: 1820-1920
Category: Industrial sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Frequent Worldtraveller (9 months ago)
Unique surrounding in the best town in Finland. Landscape beautiful and perfect for a nice stroll around the Tammerkoski rapid.
Justyna A (9 months ago)
It was nice to take a walk there, however it was so cold and windy that we didn't stay there long. But for sure the place has a great industrial spirit. I hope to come back there on summer time.
Filippo M (14 months ago)
Finlayson became the largest industrial enterprise in Scandinavia. This growth was based on unique courage and open-mindedness. The company’s weaving hall had the honour of switching on the first electric lights in the Nordic. The company had its own hospital, daycare centre, school, fire brigade, pharmacy and nursing home. The company even its own social security system at a time when no one had yet heard of such a thing. More significantly, Finlayson was the first company in Finland to offer women an opportunity to an independent life: an apartment and livelihood. Women’s status in Finnish society is evident in the fact that in 1906 Finland became the first country in Europe to grant women the right to vote.
Sami Mehtonen (15 months ago)
Atmospheric, decent restaurants and services for most tastes. Even the interior has kept some of the rustic factory vibe. Great archotecture, great food. Great for photo ops too!
Laura Wilkinson (16 months ago)
Beautiful and surprising. Can find new little nooks. Home to many nice restaurants and cafes. Lovely place in the summer but also worth seeing in winter.
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