The Finnish Labour Museum Werstas

Tampere, Finland

The Finnish Labour Museum Werstas is located in the historical Finlayson cotton mill area. At Werstas, you can visit the Textile Industry Museum, the Steam Engine Museum as well as the Labour Museum's changing and permanent exhibitions.

The exhibitions at Werstas offer an overview of the history of the industrial era, worker population and civil society from different perspectives. The constantly refreshed exhibitions present interesting events from the history of social issues, workers’ culture, visual arts and politics. At Werstas, ordinary people take centre stage and their everyday lives, work and the differences between them are recounted in the form of memorable stories. Free admission for all visitors.

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: Museum founded in 1993
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eeva-Maria Antinluoma (16 months ago)
Interesting history and exhibitions, free admittance
aju krishnan (2 years ago)
Visitors here can catch a glimpse of Finland's history and industrialization. Focusing on Finlayson cotton mill and factory workers life, there are freedom museum, steam engine museum etc.
Mikko Ylhainen (2 years ago)
ok
San Vir (2 years ago)
The museum is really great and worth checking out if you are in town. Currently there is exhibition Museum if Freedom with lots of information about Finland and freedom.
Katerina Crawford (2 years ago)
Fun place to visit. Favorite stop was a bread making machine, piano and pharmacy
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.