The Finnish Labour Museum Werstas

Tampere, Finland

The Finnish Labour Museum Werstas is located in the historical Finlayson cotton mill area. At Werstas, you can visit the Textile Industry Museum, the Steam Engine Museum as well as the Labour Museum's changing and permanent exhibitions.

The exhibitions at Werstas offer an overview of the history of the industrial era, worker population and civil society from different perspectives. The constantly refreshed exhibitions present interesting events from the history of social issues, workers’ culture, visual arts and politics. At Werstas, ordinary people take centre stage and their everyday lives, work and the differences between them are recounted in the form of memorable stories. Free admission for all visitors.

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Details

Founded: Museum founded in 1993
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mirage Sur (2 years ago)
An interesting museum of the industrial and social history of Tampere and many ways of the whole country. Take a guided tour and you'll understand what you see. Otherwise this is a tough to understand complex.
Petri Aho (2 years ago)
Quite nice place. We had Christmas party here and everything was arranged excellently.
Hertta Nurmio (2 years ago)
Great for people visiting Tampere and wanting to know more about the history (for free!) I love this museum.
Alice Picari (2 years ago)
Nice museum where to discover the 20th century in Finland
Wouter Mantel (2 years ago)
Varied museum with as showpiece a huge steam machine. Interesting machines and tools from times of revolution in Tampere and how it is related to Worldwide developments, like the use of steam cilinders and the light bulb. Moreover there was an exhibition hall about Finland during war time and temporary exhibitions.
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