Hatanpää Manor

Tampere, Finland

First record of Hatanpää dates back to year 1540 and the first manor was built in the 1690s. Hans Boije (1717-1781) improved the farming business and increased Hatanpää prosperity significantly. He also built an English garden to Hatanpää with and hired 30 gardeners to maintain it. Boije was a freemasonry and added an stone to the park with Greek engraving Egno Kyrios tous ontas antou (Lord knows his owns). The stone still exists and is known as the “grave of the freemasonry”, but no one is actually buried there.

After Boije Hatanpää manor has been owned by several families. The original main building burned in 1883 and the present one Neo-Renaissance manor was built in 1883–1885. There’s also an another Neo-Gothic manor nearby. It was built in 1898-1900 as the villa for the banker and manor owner Nils Idman. Idman was forced to sell all Hatanpää manor property to the city of Tampere in 1913. The manor was in hospital use until the new hospital was built nearby in 1930s.

Today Hatanpää manor can be booked for parties or conferences. Near the manor are beautiful rose garden and arboretum, which are very popular in the summer time.

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Details

Founded: 1883-1885
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Minna Laakso (9 months ago)
My favourite place in Tampere
Päivi Ilola (9 months ago)
Hieno juhlapaikka ja puistoalue upea, mutta surkeasti
Petri Uosukainen (9 months ago)
Hienosti rempattu kartano, mutta kovin kliininen ympäristö kun pehmeät materiaalit ovat vähissä ja seinät ovat tyhjän valkoiset.
Tiia Parikka-Hupanen (13 months ago)
Ihana puisto kävellä tai käydä piknikillä. Oikea keidas. Upeita ruusuja ja paljon. Kannattaa käydä eri vuoden aikoihin niin näkee miten puisto muuttuu. Parkkipaikka ongelma, kun siellä viihtyy niin pitkään.
Igor Efremov (2 years ago)
Beautiful place in the park with roses. Inside the palace, weddings are often celebrated.
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